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2.1 Photoshop Tools and Shortcuts

In this lesson we're going to look at Adobe Photoshop tools and shortcuts, and find out the differences between using a mouse and a tablet.

2.1 Photoshop Tools and Shortcuts

Hi, and welcome to the Fundamentals of Digital Painting. My name is Nas Peters, and in this video we are going to take a look at shortcuts, as well as mouse versus tablet. I have personally never digitally painted with a mouse, and I honestly don't want to give it a try, as I am more than comfortable with my tablet pen. A tablet pen allows for more flexibility and smoothness. It is essentially like drawing with a pen on paper. It might take some getting used to, but after a couple of tries, you easily get the hang of it. I would try drawing some simple shapes, such as squares or triangles, on a blank canvas if you're unused to using a tablet pen. [BLANK_AUDIO] As you can see in the example, I painted a wavy line on the right with a tablet pen, and then the same shape on the left with the mouse. The one on the right looks far smoother and was drawn much quicker than with the mouse. [BLANK_AUDIO] Another thing is pen pressure. Pen pressure allows you to paint by applying different pressure on a brush stroke. When you press the pen lightly on to the table, the brush stroke on the canvas will be much lighter in opacity, than when you press down harder. With a mouse there is no pen pressure and you'd have to manually change the opacity between each brush stroke if you wanted to create different opacity nuances in a brush stroke's color. It is not impossible to paint with a mouse, but it will take a lot more time and feel less natural. Moving on to the shortcuts, remember that you can let your cursor hover over the tools to see their name. Next to their name, you'll see their shortcuts between brackets. So, for the move tool, it would be the letter V on your keyboard. [BLANK_AUDIO] You could try to remember all the shortcuts if you wanted or use a cheat sheet, which is easy to find online. But it might be best to start off using the shortcuts of the tools you'll be using the most. Your favorite one for this course will be the shortcut through the letter B, which allows you to access the brush tool. When you have the brush tool selected and press down Alt it gives you access to the eye dropper tool. So, when you're painting and you need to change the color, all you need to do is to press Alt on your keyboard to quickly pick the color you need off the canvas. Next up is the letter E for the eraser tool. To move the canvas around without having to click on the hand tool all the time from the toolbar, use the space bar on your keyboard. Just hold it down as long as you need the hand tool. When you release the space bar, it automatically reverts back to the tool you were using before. Zooming in and out of the canvas. You can press the letter Z on your keyboard to quickly access the magnifying glass, or you can use Ctrl and the plus sign on your keyboard to zoom in, as well as the Ctrl and the minus sign on your keyboard to zoom out. I find them all to be as quick as the other, so it's a matter of preference in this case. Now for some shortcuts to use while using the brush tool. Select the brush tool by pressing the letter B on your keyboard. Draw a wavy line at the top of the canvas. If your brush size is too big, you can change it in the navigation bar, or you can right-click on the canvas and make the brush size and selection pop up. Once your wavy line is drawn, we want to draw a perfectly straight line underneath. To do this hold down Shift on your keyboard while drawing this line out. This works both vertically and horizontally. Holding down Shift won't work to create a diagonal line though. For this we want to use a different shortcut. Move your brush down and then click on the canvas at the bottom left. Now hold Shift and click to the top right. It draws the line diagonally for you. You can try these shortcuts out a couple of times to get used to them. I will be repeating the shortcuts as we work on the illustration, and we'll put them into action. I'll gradually and slowly repeat them less and less. And that's it for the shortcuts. [BLANK_AUDIO] In the next video, we are going to start working on the illustrations, starting off with a line art. Well, I have made the finished line art available for you to use, so you could start painting straight away. If you are new to using the brush tool, working on the line art will allow you to use all those shortcuts very repetitively, and practice using the brush tool before actually starting to paint. Thank you for listening.

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