Digitalpainting
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2.4 Painting in Grayscale: Detail Work

We are going to continue working on our grayscale painting by making the details of the character more prominent. This will allow for more depth in the illustration.

2.4 Painting in Grayscale: Detail Work

Hi, and welcome to the fundamentals of digital painting. My name is Nas Peters and in this video we are going to continue working on the grayscale. We will be making the details of the character more prominent, which will allow for more depth in the illustration. As we did in the previous grayscale video, we are going to be using the brush tool, opacity levels and fill percentage, as well as changing the brush size throughout. We will be creating new and separate layers for the shades and the highlights and applying different blending modes and opacity levels on these two. And we'll of course use the eraser tool as well when you make little mistakes here or there or need to adjust a brush stroke. By now you'll be a bit more comfortable using shortcuts and or will find it easier to locate the tools in the toolbar. Due to this I won't be repeating the shortcuts as often as I did in the previous videos. It's not a race though, so take your time and use a cheat sheet if you need it, or go back to the shortcut video to refresh your memory. Where we used relatively large brush sizes in the previous grayscale video, we are going to be using a much thinner brush this time around. Create a new layer on top of all the other shading and highlight layers and aim for a brush size between five and ten px. The other shading layers are quite low in the pass view. This is so it blends well with the base grey color, where as the shading layer we are going to paint now will be much darker creating a new nuance and adding more depth to the painting. Once you have chosen your brush size, zoom in and pick an area you want to start on. I'm starting off with the hair. You'll notice that I'm basically following the liner which is most covered by the other shading layers. Use the hand tool to move the canvas around as you continue to apply the shade. You want to fill in the darkest areas again but also extenuate the shape of what you're painting by contouring the liner with thin brush strokes. With the hair, you want to use the shading layer to separate the strands from one another with a shadow. For the face, you want to touch the features which are either surrounded by more prominent features. For example the eye sockets are more deeply settled in to the skull and surrounded by a brown cheekbones, as well as temples and the bridge of the nose. All these cast a shadow on the eye socket, making this a darker area than other parts of the face. Considering the light source, the underside of her nose is not in direct contact with light so you can add a shadow there. More often than not, one lip is more shadowcast than another. Usually it is the upper lip as the bottom one protrudes further forward than the upper one. We want to contour the face with shadows as well as her face is completely surrounded by hair. So the hair would cast a shadow onto her forehead and cheeks. You can use a much larger brush lowering the opacity to fill in the darker side of her face. In this case that would be the right side. Press down lightly with your tablet pen and cover the side of her face with a heavier shadow. You can use circular motions to blend it in with the harsher shadow along the edge of her face. If you're finding pen pressure a bit tricky just lower the opacity way down so the brush strokes won't risk being too dark. Remember that it's okay to fill entire sections off with a shadow. Even if you feel you are losing detail in the illustration, contrasting elements and materials will give you a much more in-depth result. I sometimes use a different brush that has a square aspect for materials such as metal. It gives it sharper edge shadows and creates a slight difference between the rest of the shading. The brush is available in the default brushes, same settings as the hard-edged round brush. You want to play around with brush size and opacity levels here as well. The metal that overlaps one another is where a lot of shadow would be, so allow it to be much darker there than the rest. You don't want the shadow to bleed out too far into the metal plates as metal is reflective and highlights will play a bigger role in these materials. Now you want to continue applying this onto the entire character. Just focus on folds, indents, creases and overlapped sections in the character illustration, and focus the shading on there. Remember that the main light source is coming from the front left. You can black out the belt area a lot as well as her side behind the shield. The underside of her braid, and the parting between her pants. Make sure to darken the underside of the cloak around her hip as well. You can always pause the video and look at the unblended shading as I have it, and use it as a reference. When you are ready, we can apply a blending mode on the layer, and lowered in opacity. It's too overwhelmingly dark right now. So we want to tweak this. I end up using blend mode multiply and lower the opacity to 40%. There are still some areas that should be far darker than the overall shade on the character. Create a new layer, select the brush tool, and use a big size. Now, just touch up the darkest area so they're obviously different in tone from the overall character shape. This includes the left shoulder, the neck, the underside of her braid, the top of her forehead, the inside of her left arm, and her right side. Add more contrast to the center of her legs as well as the underside of the cloak. Once that is done tweak the blending mode and the opacity level until you are happy with the result, these areas need to be darker than the rest of the shading. And there we are. We can now focus on the highlights. There won't be as many highlight layers as there were for the shading. First we are going to tweak the highlight layer we already have. So go into the highlight folder, select one layer in there and lower the opacity level from 50 to about 40%. This way the white isn't as harsh and the gray base color blends smoothly into the white, and you can see that it connects the highlight with the shade we just finished seamlessly. We are going to make the highlight stand out more, just not with that layer. So create a new layer, select a brush tool. Make sure the color you have selected is white, and use a very thin size. Lower the opacity on the brush not the layers somewhere in between 50 and 60%. Zoom in and focus on the highlights you have already got in place. Aim for the center of each highlight and then gently paint over that section to brighten it, remembering the light source paint over the areas which are closest to it. Once you have completed it, hide and unhide this layer and check if you need to lower your opacity on it. It might be too bright so lower it somewhere between 50 and 80%. We have completed the gray scale and can now move on. In the next video, we are going to add in the base colors and take a look on how to modify these so the grayscale shading blends in with them. Thank you for listening.

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