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Digitalpainting
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4.1 Fabric

In this lesson we'll add in the fabric and cloth materials that make up the clothing and accessories.

4.1 Fabric

Hi, and welcome to the fundamentals of digital painting. My name is Nas Peters, and in this video we are going to paint the fabric and cloth materials in the illustration. As you can see, I have marked down the areas which are cloth material with a blue tint so you know what we'll be focusing on. Fabrics can look very different from one another and you add patterns and painting techniques to some to give them a different look. For example, the clip material hanging from her hip with line art based colors and grayscale shading is of a very shiny aspect. If you wanted it to look a bit dulled or rough, you could add a light pattern over it, or use the smudge tool to change the appearance of the painting. You can also use filters, such as moist, to add texture to the fabric. If you left the liner visible, it gives the fabric harder contours, and makes it look a bit plastic, or violet letter. Or, as you can see in the samples I'm painting, you could use this march tool to blend the colors in more seamlessly, and it'll have a silk-like aspect. Let's start with a small rectangular shape to begin with, the color. We'll be using the custom brushes we've made and a round hard edge brush. I choose the circular shape custom cloud brush and size it down a lot. We will be using the Eyedropper tool quite a bit for this, so remember that when you have the brush tool selected and press down Alt on your keyboard, you can pick a color off your canvas quickly. Lower the opacity on your brush so the color doesn't come out too harshly as we paint. After creating a new layer, choose one of the dark reds where the shadow is most prominent. Then gently paint over the black line art to make it fade away, replacing it with red. There's no rush, better go slowly at first if you're not used to it. After you've covered the line art, we are going to focus on the lighter area over on the right side. You will see that there is a bit of a rectangular shadow which creates a strange cutoff, so pick that color and then paint the red inwards into the collar so it blends in with the lighter color at the center. You can paint it over the darker areas a bit to create a light fold in the center, and darken the fold with a black color. Create a new layer then and use a small brush with a light pale red color to draw cross hatch like pattern over the material giving, it a rougher look. It doesn't have to be neat. Lower the opacity on the layer so it isn't as prominent, and then create another layer and use the color black to retrace the pattern giving the texture some depth. On that same layer, use a much lighter color to highlight the lightest area of the color. The section underneath the metal plates can be very dark since there's barely any light there. This makes it easier to paint as well since you're basically filling it in with black leaving very little red. The straps at the bottom though hold more ligh,t so counter the darkest area with black, but use red to hide the outer line outline. Essentially, you want to make the liner bleed into the larger portions of black shadow and hide the line art in the lightest areas with the color that is set right next to it. So, for the belt area use gray tones to blend the line art into the shape. If the black is too harsh, use your brush to push the gray color towards the shadow. Make sure the opacity on your brush is still set somewhere between 60%-70% so the shading underneath isn't lost. It's okay if it looks slightly messy when zoomed in, the minute you zoom out, you'll see that the messiness becomes less apparent. If you were aiming to draw an illustration for a very large viewing purposes, then of course you would have to add more detail so that the blending transfers at that larger size. But in this case, I don't plan on printing this illustration life size, so that much detail is not necessary. It would actually be lost. Keep creating new layers when you start on a new section, or if you intend to change the blending mode. It's definitely a good way to go if you're using very dark colors. It'll be easier to load the opacity afterwards in case the contrast is too harsh. As always for dark colors, I tend to go with the blending modes multiply or color burn. For the cloak, I redefined the shadows, making them more prominent and fading the line art into them, so that the triangular shaped cloth piece hanging from the the belt look as though they are lying on top of the cloak, rather than looking as though they are floating above it a bit. I am still using the circular cloud brush. I lower the opacity underlayer so the shadow isn't quite as heavy, and then pick a dark red off the cloak with the eyedropper tool, to contour the cloak's outline, fading out the line art and fold lines. The outline where the line hits will help accentuate the highlight further. So, zoom in and use a very small brush with a vibrant color red to cover the line art, and add little detailed lines across the folds. It's pretty simple since the shading is already in place thanks to the gray scale you're basically zooming in and replacing the line art with the color it touches to remove the cartoon like aspect from the illustration. When you want the material to look rougher, you add in a pattern. Now, let's focus on something with a bit more detail. The pants have those oval holes at the bottom, so that will be fun to paint when it comes to the highlights. First though, you want to darken the shadows a bit further. Use a relatively large brush, still the circular cloud shape. Size up the brush quite a bit and set it at a low opacity. You can use some grey tones to help make the folds pop a little more obviously. Do this on a new layer so you can lower the opacity on it and allow it to blend in with the shadows. That seems like a lot of layers we're making, but I find it better to be safe than sorry. Plus, the layer option is right there. Zoom in on the bottom of the pants and size the brush down. Mine is at 15. Choose a very light gray and lower the opacity on the brush to about 40%. To give the impression that the holes are a layer of fabric underneath the main fabric of the pants, we are going to detail the highlights of these holes on one side and create a shadow on the inside at the opposite end. The hole that I am focusing on right now has it's highlights on the right. So, I gently paint a gray line along the side of this. Continue to do this with the other ones and you can even out some lines along the bottom edge of the folds of the pants to accentuate those further as well. Avoid adding too much of these leg lines where there is a lot of shadow. Now lower the opacity on this layer to about 20%. It doesn't have to be very light, as we're going to repeat this exact same process, only with a much thinner brush this time around. Choose a lighter gray this time so it's different from it's base underneath, and retrace the outlines. Once you're finished, tweak the opacity on these layers until you're happy with how it looks. After this, select a black color and increase the brush size to add in the shadows and the holes. As well as accentuating the fill for the bottom end of the pants. Change the blending mode on the layer to multiply and lower the opacity a bit so the red comes through again. You'll notice that the colors across the top of the pants are a little bit faded. While this can add texture we can use gradients to smooth these areas out a bit. So, select the gradient tool by pressing the letter j on your keyboard, and then use the eye dropper tool to pick a light grey off the pants. Then, go into the gradient editor and select the gradient which as the grey color, but fades into transparency. This should normally be automatically selected. Make sure the gradient is circular. With these settings, create two small circular gradients on top of each leg. Change the blending mode of this layer. I set it on color dodge and lowered the opacity of it. If you find it lights up the wrong areas set the blending mode back to normal to see the entire shape and use the eraser tool to erase the gradient on the sections you don't want it to blend in. Some last touch ups on the pants. I find that the red in the holes isn't that visible anymore. So, I quickly add some red brush strokes back into the hole to bring the red back. And that's pretty much it for the fabrics. Place all your layers into its own folder, and then have fun hiding and unhiding to see the difference. In the next video, we are going to focus on the shield and paint a wood material on top of it, using a tree bark as a reference. Thank you for listening.

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