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Digitalpainting
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2.5 Creating Our Base Colors

It's time to start thinking in color! We are going to apply base colors on top of the grayscale, and then tweak this layer so the shading of the grayscale is visible through the colors.

2.5 Creating Our Base Colors

Hi, and welcome to The Fundamentals of Digital Painting. My name is Nas Peters, and in this video, we are going to apply the base colors on top of the gray scale and then tweak this layer so the shading of the gray scale is visible through the colors. This process is actually really simple. It's just a matter of creating a new layer on top of the gray scale folder, which contains your highlights and shading folder, and then change the blending mode on this layer which holds your colors. Let's get started. We are going to focus on the skin first. I am going to be using the default swatches in Photoshop. So bring up the Swatches panel. Either it is already in your interface over on the right or you can grab it by going to Window > Swatches. Once it's up on your screen, you'll see a row of brown colors at the bottom. After creating a new layer, select the brush tool and pick a round hard edged brush. Set the flow and opacity at a 100%, as we need this color to completely cover the shading. I picked an orange tinted brown, from the second set of browns. Now, simply fill in the area which is skin. Remember to fill in the hands as well, unless you'd rather she's wearing gloves, of course. Now zoom back out and go to change to blending mode. This time around, we are going to use the blend mode overlay. And there you go, the color is now overlaying the shading and highlights, making them visible through it. I find it easier to add in the colors when the blending mode is set on normal, that way you are sure you're covering all the areas and not missing some spots and leaving gaps. So I changed the blending mode back to normal and then use a white color to fill in the eyes. I want to lighten the color of the lips as well but don't find the color which I like in the Swatches panel. Pressing down Alt on my keyboard with the brush tool still selected, I pick the skin color and then double click the color itself in the toolbar to bring up the color picker. I pick a lighter and more orange tinted shade which I did apply on the lips. Now, continue to color in each section of the drawing. You can use the same color as I am using, or choose your own. You could color in each section on a separate layer. This way, it'll be easier to change the color after, as all you'll need to do is hold down Ctrl on your keyboard, and click on the layer with your tablet pen. It'll create the selection for you on the shape. Then go into the color picker, choose a new color, click OK, and then use Ctrl+backspace to apply this new color. If for example, you colored the hair on the same layer as you did the skin, like I did, because I make silly mistakes sometimes, use the magic wand to click on the color shape you want to change the color of. I then created a new layer to separate this new hair color from the skin tone, went into the color picker and chose a brighter red then press Ctrl+backspace on your keyboard to apply this new color in the selection. If coloring everything by hand becomes a bit annoying at some point, especially for large sections, you can always use the magic wand, go into the layer which holds the line art and select the area you wish to fill in. Then make sure to select the color layer, not the line art layer. Choose a color and then press Ctrl+backspace to fill the section in. Make to sure to zoom in afterwards and fill in the gaps with the brush tool. Continue to fill in the all areas you wish to be a different color from the gray base tone we initially used. [BLANK_AUDIO] I left the sword and metal armor plates on her body the same tone as the gray base tone is a good base color for metal. What we are going to do to make these materials look more reflective is add in a gradient. We want to select these materials, so select the magic wand tool and go into the line art layer. Click on the sections you wish to give a metal aspect. I'm starting off with the shoulders. Once I've made the selection I expand the selection by two pixels so it hugs the line art tightly, and then select new layer I created to place the gradient in. Now, we want to select the gradient tool. Either find it in the toolbar or, or press the letter G on your keyboard. Once that done, you'll notice a navigation bar at the top changing, giving you the gradient options. We are going to pick the gradient we want to use, so click on the gradient editor. We are going to chose a gradient wich goes from white to black. Now we are going to chose the shape of the gradient. You can find these options right beside the gradient editor. Right now, mine is selected as linear gradient and I want to change it to circular gradient. If you hover your cursor over the icons the name of each will appear. Once you've got the gradient set up, choose a direction you want the gradient to start from. I want the black to be on her right side, and the white on her left. So, I click down above her right shoulder and then drag the gradient line out across the selection we made. When you release, the gradient will have placed itself within the selection. You can try it several times until you like the direction of the gradient. Once you are happy with the result, deselect by pressing Ctrl+D on your keyboard and continue to apply this process on the other sections you want to have a metal aspect. Make sure that all your base color layers are set on overlay so the gray scale shading can be seen through it. For the layer holding the gradient, which cover the metal materials, you can try other blending modes, such as color dodge, screen, or soft light. Play around with the blending modes until you found one you like, and tweak the opacity if need be. And that's it. The base colors have now been applied, and blended in with the gray scale underneath. In the next video we are going to look at color temperatures, unifying the base colors a bit so they fit well together. And we'll also be talking about the first completed version of this illustration before taking it to the next level. Thank you for listening.

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