Digitalpainting
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3.2 Hair

In this video we are going to be painting the hair. We will be relying on the line art and the shape it already has, as well as creating a brush which will allow us to paint several hair strokes at a time, instead of having to paint them one by one. This will simplify the process.

3.2 Hair

Hi, and welcome to The Fundamentals of Digital Painting. My name is Nas Peters. And in this video we are going to be painting hair. We will be relying on the line art and the shape it already has as well as create a brush which will allow us to paint several hair strokes at a time rather than painting them one by one. This will simplify the process. We are going to start off by making a new brush. Create a new layer and then select the round, hard edged brush. Size it down somewhere between 10 and 20. Pick the color black and focus on a blank spot on the canvas. Now, paint small dots in a row. I decided to go with five, each a different size. Then just like we did to create the other brushes, we want to hide the background layer and use the laso tool to create a selection around these dots. Continue to turn it into a brush by going into Edit > Define Brush Preset. Title it if you want and then click OK. You can now unhide the background layer. We want to test out the new brush and see how the ceilings react on the brushstrokes. You'll notice the dots are scattered, rather than linear shaped. So go into the brush settings to tweak this. If you were to uncheck the shape dynamics, it will create a linear trajectory. But you can still see the dot shapes in these lines, so we need to tweak the settings so it smooths out. To do this I select the shade dynamics again and tweak the angle jitter around this jitter to create the linear shape of the brush. Once that's done I test a brush out again. There's still a bit of roundness but we won't be using the brush at a large size as the one I have selected at the moment. So the dotted aspect will fade the smaller the brush size is. Erase the dots you made to create your brush from or delete that layer and create a new one to paint the hair on. Zoom in on the top of the character's head and size down the dotted brush we just made. It can be quite small. I have mine at 12. Large enough so you can see the shape of the brush but not so big that the dotted aspect transfers into strokes. I select a black color and focus on the shaded areas. This brush will help thicken the hair giving it the illusion of multiple layers and thinner strands of hair which pop out the hairdo, making it look more natural. Because of the settings we applied on the brush, we don't need to load the opacity or flow. Gently paint over the darkest areas, hiding the line art, bit by bit, so the red blends into the shadows rather than being cut off in the line art sections. You can use the same dotted brush on the eraser tool and leave strands that came out too thick. It's okay if it goes outside of the lines a bit. Once you're done hide and unhide the layer to see the difference so far. If you find it too dark, lower the opacity on the layer just a bit so the red can become more visible underneath. Just make sure the shape doesn't rely on the line art as much as it did before. Clean up some of the messy areas if need be with the eraser and brush tools. Moving on to the next step. Create new layer on top of the one we just finished. We're going to keep using the same brush, only changing the color. I'm going to be using a lighter and more vibrant red. If you happen to have used a different color for the hair, simply use a lighter and more vibrant color than the one you have the hair as. For this we do want to lower the opacity in the brush as we want the shading nuances to be visible underneath our painting. I lowered the opacity on the brush to 70%. Now, just like we did with the black, we want to paint some strokes over to the lightest areas in the hair, filling it out a bit and giving the shape more volume. We will be using a blending mode on this layer so don't worry if you happen to cover dark areas. Once done change the blending mode to either overlay, soft light or color dodge. I personally went with overlay but those three modes will compliment the highlights although color dodge may come out quite harshly. I actually lowered the opacity underlay to 80% as I find overlay to be a bit too flashy as well. Now, repeat this exact same process only with an even lighter color. For red I will be using a very light pink. You also want to make the brush size smaller as this will act as the thinner strands that are highlighted across the hair. Make sure to create a new layer for this. As you can see I avoided painting strands in the side of her hair which has most shadow. Only covering the areas which contain most light. For this layers blending mode you do want to opt for color dodge. It'll help make those strands pop out from the rest of the colors. If it's too vibrant lower the opacity on layer just a bit. Now, if you place all the hair layers in to it's own folder you can hide and unhide it to see the difference from before and after real quick. The hair now holds more contrast, looks a bit thicker and the colors flow through the strands. You can continue adding to the hair, adding more layers with a dotted brush or using the round hard edge brush at a very low size to add very small individual strands of hair to give it a more threaded aspect. You won't be able to notice these very much, unless you were to look at the illustration, zoomed in. But adding details is a lot of un. You could call it complete, or add some different color shades to the hair. For this we will use one of the custom color brushes we made. It can be relatively big size, as it's like smudging colors onto the hair, rather than painting precisely. I decide to go for a very flashy purple with tints of blue in it and focus the paint smudges mostly in the contrasted areas. The opacity is set pretty low on the brush, so the brush strokes aren't as hard edged. Once done, tweak a blending mode under layer and change the opacity if need be. And that's it. We are done with the hair. In the next video, we are going to start painting different textures, starting off with fabrics. Thanks for listening.

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