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5.1 Ink the Mouth

We’ve worked our way through inking in the large areas of the portrait. That means we’re now ready to start on the small, detail areas. First off, we’ll work on the mouth as it’s the least intimidating of the eyes, nose, and mouth. I’ll be showing you the key areas of the mouth to keep light and others to make dark to give the appearance of volume in the lips.

5.1 Ink the Mouth

Now that we've inked in all the large value areas of our drawing, it's time to go in and do the fine details. And while this might seem like the most difficult part of the tutorial, I've broken everything up into separate lessons, so that I can really share with you all the tips I know for inking things like the eyes, the nose, and the mouth. So I'll be walking you through each one separately. So in addition to having your sketch, you'll obviously want to have again a black and white photo and the gradation scale as references. Once you have all these, let's get in and start on the details. It's finally time to move on and do the fine detail areas of our piece. Since detail areas are so small, it's a little bit harder to do the same blending techniques that I've been teaching you and that we'll be doing in a later lesson for the entire portrait that we're drawing. So I wanted to go in before we do each of these areas, starting with the mouth, and just walk you through a few key things to keep in mind, including some tips to make sure you don't go too dark or create solid lines with your pointillism. So I'm gonna be using a Sharpie and just some scratch paper so you can see it really clearly what I'll be telling you. So when it comes to the mouth, one thing that you want to keep in mind, you've obviously got on the top lip, right along the area where the two lips meet. This is gonna be your dark area. And so the best way to do that is to go in with your dots and make an almost solid line, and then you'll be able to go up from there to make the shadow above it. You want to keep in mind that right at the cleft, it's gonna be dark as well, and the corners. For the bottom lip, in this case it's the left side, you've got the shadow where the lip follows, it curves out right here. And then you've got the bottom part of that cleft. You're gonna have a little bit of shadow there. And you also want to make sure you keep the highlight for the bottom lip. This really helps to define the shape of the lips. And as always, to make our outside edges of the lips, we're going to make a dotted line. That way it still breathes and nothing feels too much like a contour line. So I'm going to grab my portrait and I'll talk you through as we start to seamlessly blend using our value scale, blend in the pointillism dots and make some lips. All right. So the first thing I always like to do, just so I don't lose it later, is clearly define those close dots, the area where the two lips meet. So you can see where I'm making it dark, and this where I won't lose it later. Then I'm gonna start to fill in the shadow area of the left side. And I'm really just looking closely at my drawing. When I see an area that's lighter, I'm just easing up on the dots. And when I see an area that's darker, I'm gonna put more of them down. So as you do more pointillism portraits, this will be how you do the majority of your piece. It's a little more intuitive. It involves more deep looking at the piece, making sure your values are right. You won't think in terms of numbers. You'll think just more in terms of that, what that value looks like and how many dots it is. All right. I'm gonna go back in, make it just a hair darker where I see it needs to get pushed, especially right along the bottom of the upper lip. And then the bottom lip, I'm just going to draw that outer perimeter. And it's important to keep the lips, this little area here, white, or at least a very light value. That shows that there is a lift and a curve to the lips as they come away from the face. So that's important to have there so that the viewer really gets a feeling of depth. [BLANK AUDIO]. So I'm just going to fill in this little shadow area here where the cleft is. Pushing things a little bit darker. Making sure I keep the highlights and just a few little dots at the top. They're in a slight shadow. The lips are sometimes, have, you can use the same fill as you used for the hair, where you have those little tendrils that come up, because lips always have these little ridges in them. Some people have them more than others. All right. So don't worry if it's not pushed to its full value yet in terms of darkness. We're gonna go back when we blend everything, and we'll be able to push it to make sure it's at the right spot. But once you've got your lips filled in to where you feel comfortable, take a step back, see what you think. Then we're gonna move on now, and I'm gonna talk you through what to do for the nose.

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