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4.2 Finishing Off the Face

In this lesson, we will continue with inking our face values. Again, use your gradation scale as a guide to make sure you don’t go too dark or keep it too light.

4.2 Finishing Off the Face

Now we're gonna move on and do the value six areas of our drawing. So you want to use your value scale to give you references to how dark to go on those areas. So you just dot along and just fill it in again. If you're like me, you like to work left to right. Just feels more comfortable. And as before, we're gonna be avoiding the areas with lots of detail like the eyes, the nose and the mouth. We'll save those for another chapter. We'll go much more in-depth into how to create those fine detail areas. And not lose all the details as you're working with dots instead of lines or brush strokes or color. So, you're probably a little worried at this point, cause it looks a bit choppy. Don't worry, we're gonna go back in right near the end and blend everything. It's gonna look gorgeous. Just filling in the areas. When you work along an edge like I'm going to now along the chin. What I like to do is actually run along the pencil line and just evenly space my dots. This way I have a line with openings in it that allows the eye to move through. So the viewer sees a line that breathes instead of a solid line. Visually this is much more comforting, and it doesn't appear as a harsh edge. So that's a little trick that I always use. And then what I like to do is kind of avoid that line as I get close to it when I fill in the rest of the area. If you put too many dots in one spot, as you probably saw on your values scale, you can start to create a solid black shape. So constantly moving around, eliminates this risk. So you can see, obviously we're gonna have to go back later because at the moment it looks like I have a very nice goatee going. All right, and if you're like me and as you're moving around you're finding all of these number four spots to number two spots that you missed, just go back and fill them in don't worry. There's no way you could have gotten them all the first time through. Some of them are so small it's hard to remember what number you put in them. So I'm just moving my picture around here so I can see the printed portrait underneath to compare, make sure I'm doing it right. You can always use the printed photo as reference. That's always a better guide then the little areas that we drew. As we go along, your perception might change of how dark an area really was. I'm going to have the neck now. So an example of going back and seeing something different later. You can see here it's a little bit lighter right under my chin that I initially put. So I'm just going to make sure I scale back a bit when I do the dots there We just have a little bit left here in the neck to do. And just go at your own pace. Pointillism, if anything, is a very slow and patient art. You can be thankful that we're not like Seurat in having to use three or four different colors you just have to worry about one. Last big area here, we have a six value. That means you have just one area left to do in the skin which is the eight and we'll be able to use our cheating technique there. If you're like me and you get bored easily, you can always jump around from the start to the finish of an area. Go from different sides of it, sometimes that's enough to break what can seem like a monotony of dots. You can certainly start to see that the portrait is taking form now. You can see the different value areas, the shadow is coming in. We're almost done here now. All right, last area. So, once you fill out the number sixes on your portrait that are in the large face are then it will be time to move on. And in the next little lesson we are going to put it in all of the eights. All right, we're in the last value for the enlargers of the face. So we're on to eight, and this is when we get to start cheating. Yay, so gonna fill in the area, get it up to about a six like we did on our value scale. And then we'll be able to put the swiggles on top of it to make it even darker. Now it gets a little difficult when you use this technique in an actual drawing is that. There are not it's not as clear cut of boundaries as it was in the value square where it was in the square. So you might not keep the exact shape as you drew out originally because the area that we are putting these dots in is the same value that we just put down. This is where you want to use your portrait as a reference, that photo I gave you, and make sure you dot in the right area. Just got one more area down here. [BLANK AUDIO] And then, the glasses are going to be about an eighth as well, so we'll fill that in in this section, since those are just a flat shape. And you can put squiggles on top. All right, so one last little area that is hiding. I'm going to do my ear. Shadows are always, obviously, generally where the eights hang out. And then we're going to go on here and do the glasses. So again, I just like to work left to right. We'll use the trick where you dot along the perimeter line. So this always makes me feel more comfortable too, I know I have a barrier that I can visually see better than just a pencil line so I know I won't cross it. And having those gaps in the outline instead of just filling it in solid. It makes it even more apparent that you dotted this entire thing. You start putting in straight solid lines, they don't appear anywhere else so they really stick out. Glasses are sometimes hard to get right, because of the angles in them. And they can certainly show that you haven't gotten your perspective right or your angles right if you've got a little kink in them. I'm constantly checking the angles when I draw glasses Also if you get the glasses angle off, then you could have droopy eyeballs [LAUGH] too wide a space between the eyes. Just going back in, making it a little bit darker. Just adding some of the squiggly lines. Try to make sure for this portrait that you have quite a few values to work with. I think filet my glasses are quite dark so, it gave you something to use your value eight and nine on. If you start to feel comfortable too, what you can do in these almost solid black areas, is actually just begin to move your pen as you put the dot down. So when the pen touches the surface you kind of squiggle it a little bit. Instead of just making dots, you can actually start to make kind of curves and such. And so what it does is it's simply speeding up the process of filling in that space. It will still look like dots at the end. So you don't have to worry about that. It's almost identical to the trick I showed you earlier, where you dot and then squiggle. This is just for the small areas. It's a way to speed it up even faster. Especially if you're just going to be making a nine. These tight places, it's hard to make big squiggly lines, so just dragging the pen a little bit when you put it down accomplishes the same thing. All right, now we're gonna turn this here. Sometimes the ink takes a little bit longer to dry on the surface. So I don't want to run my hand through it. Rounding the last bit of the frame. Then we just have the bow to do. Here again, I'm just putting in the squiggles. Speeding up the process. All right, I'm just gonna lay down my outline again. And here where i missed value six so I'll just go in and add that. Make sure you don't forget it. Now my glasses on the bow, you can see they've got some little ridges and designs on them. For the sake of this being our first portrait, I'm just gonna make them solid. If you'd like, you can put them in. We're getting very near the end here. Just have an inch left. Then they have the dots. You can see now why you might not want to do a portrait with a black background [LAUGH]. Or wear all black in your portrait. At that point, I would almost suggest using black paper and white ink and completely inverting this process. It would save you the most amount of time. All right, we're just gonna put some squiggles over this making sure not to get too close to the outside line. So we keep the illusion that it's all just dots. All right, filled in that last spot that I missed there. So now you can see we've put in the value 8 into our large face areas. So, in the next chapter, we're gonna go on, and learn how to do the fabric.

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