Unlimited WordPress themes, graphics, videos & courses! Unlimited asset downloads! From $16.50/m
by
Lessons:16Length:2.1 hours
Point400x277
  • Overview
  • Transcript

6.3 Blending the Hair

There’s just the hair left and we’ll be using the same two techniques that we did for the face. We’ll start by adding in another layer of dots where the value areas meet, and then we’ll push the darks to create even more depth and volume in the hair. Our aim is to have all the values, from 0 to 9, in the hair when we’re finished.

6.3 Blending the Hair

We just have one area left to push the values and blend in and that's the hair. So we're going to be doing the same thing that we did with the face, which is using the photograph as a reference and using also the values scale. And really going in to push those three and four and five value areas, the odd numbers that we didn't initially put in. And this is just gonna help to balance out the top of the drawing, with the weight of the really dark darks in the bottom of the drawing. So I'm just gonna be moving around like before, filling things in. I'll pull my hands back from time to time so you can get a better look at what I'm doing. A lot of the important thing to keep in mind is to string your dots together. To create more lines and that gives an illusion of strands of hair, much better than just clumps of dots. And the hair line is always going to be a little darker because of the shadow formed by the hair curving up. So if you're like me and you're just kind of jumping back and forth that's perfectly fine. And keep seeing things differently, noticing you forgot to push it dark enough in an area. Squinting from time to time also really helps to make sure your values are accurate, matching those on the portrait. You'll never get the hair to completely match what's in the photograph, just because it's so detailed and so fine. But as long as you get close, just give the illusion that there's some structure in the hair. Little crevices that go back deeper, and that's all just using the dots secrete shadows. You can see that some parts of my hair here are really light, there's just these little patches, strings of darker shadow. And that's fine, just leave it as white as it needs to be. [SOUND] If you were drawing a portrait of somebody with darker hair obviously it would be almost the inverse of this where it would be mostly the darker values and you're just adding, you're leaving a few areas for it to be lighter, but you've got the opposite here. [LAUGH] So one part of the drawing where you'll save a lot of time is in my hair You can already see it's starting to get a little more detailed, adding some depth. So we're just going to keep pushing the value here. A little bit darker on this side, away from the light source. Now, as you get near the edge, you know, just leave those open dotted lines. Let the viewer's eye fill in the rest. You can see it's much darker on this side of the head. Just balancing it out against the other parts of the face. And I just keep moving my drawing around so that I can get a clear view of the portrait and see, you know, where I'm following along. I'll turn it sometimes, whatever makes it easiest for my hand to reach that area. A little lighter in here. Move it to this side. So this area in here is a little bit difficult since there isn't much. So what I'm gonna do is just add a little bit more shadow right at the line where the hair would start. It's a pretty buzz cut there. And just add these little shapes of shadow, these little grouping of dots. And that gives the illusion of little clumps of hair there. Little tufts that are creating shadows. So, if you have somebody with really close hair like this, it's a great way to do it. Just give little signs that there's shadow and texture there. And then just blend it into the rest. All right, I think we're almost done here. Just gonna add a little bit more dark in here. Push this little tuft of hair up here. That will really help to play into the darkness below. [SOUND] Then we'll add a little back up here. All right. So. Now you can see we've got the values, zero through nine throughout the entire drawing. And that means that we're finished.

Back to the top