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4.4 Ink the Even Values in the Hair

After the darkness of the shirt, the light values in the hair are easy! In this lesson we’ll be inking in the even values of the hair from 2 to 8. I’ll be discussing a few techniques to ensure the dots actually read as strands of hair. We’ll be stringing our dots together to create lines and jutting out from our value area lines to give the illusions of depth and irregularity in the tresses.

4.4 Ink the Even Values in the Hair

Now that we've inked in all of the ledgers of the face and the clothes, it's time to move on to some finer details. So the first thing that we're gonna do is tackle the hair. So hair is a little different than skin or clothing because it's not a solid object. It's make up of individual strands. And we really need to show that when we ink it. So one of the major differences is that instead of inking up to the boundary lines like we did elsewhere, we wanna have little bits of lines of dots come off of it to represent strands of hair. And also where you can see here, we're gonna leave some white strands in the area of a darker value to represent another clump of hair. So the first thing that I always like to do, and now that we've been working more and getting better at seeing value in our portrait, is to go in and add more little valley areas to the hair. There are a couple new areas that I'm starting to see that would be a number two in here. So just taking my pencil and really just making sure that I'm seeing more of the nuances of the hair. We'll obviously go back in later when we start to blend, and we'll do lots of these little one values right along the hairline. But it's a good idea to just get a better feel for where we'll be inking in this process. So just take your time, look around, see that your values still match up with what you said earlier. And then we're gonna move on, and I'll show you how to start inking, and we will start with the number two value area. All right. So it's gonna be just like before where wherever there is a number two, we'll be using our value scale to tell us just how dark we need to go in that area. And I always like to start, oddly enough, right along the hairline. So the hairline's always gonna be a little bit darker just because of the way the hair curves and creates a shadow. So you can see, instead of just having a solid line, I'm really starting to just get an uneven edge as I go along. And that's what's really going to convey the appearance of individual strands. So don't be scared to just let your dots go up and outside the boundaries that you drew. That's perfectly fine. And again, even now as you start to look at it you might see little pockets of darker areas where you could start to put in the two value. I got some up here that I didn't see before right on the end of this tuft. Obviously, depending on what color of hair you're gonna be inking, you'll be using different value or different values. So since mine is so light, I don't use too many of the darker ones. Stay pretty low on the value scale. Which does make it faster to draw. That's is partly why I used a photo of myself for this project. All right, and we've just got one more section right in here. Just dot in the two value. And we'll start adding in the four. All right, so now we're moving on, adding in the number four value so you can see. I got the darker hairs that goes further back away from the light. So again, you can see it's got little pockets where it's darker and then lighter, so you won't be able to follow the photo exactly. It's more creating the illusion. So, I'm here leaving white pockets in that area, having the darker extend past the boundary. Art is all about illusion anyway. We'll be touching all of this up, and pushing the limits a little bit in terms of value when we go back in and blend everything. So don't worry too much about how it looks. I'm just gonna get a base value down, and we can build on that. So just leaving white areas again. So you can see I've got these little streaks of hair that stay white. And you can see I'm moving my paper around a lot. I'm trying to keep in view what I'm looking at, the photo for reference. But also make sure I'm not covering up too much for you to see. So just making those uneven borders here. Two little strips wrap. Another trick, too, is to really start to create lines with your dots and not solid lines, but very similar to what we do along the pencil line when we set up the borders in the skin and such. Right on the contour line for the jaw. Right around the ear. So you just go in and string together a series of ink dots. And then you create the illusion that it's a strand of hair. So my hair has quite a bit of the value four. You'll see that there are lots of really tiny spots too. And again we'll definitely get those when we go back in to blend. Because we'll start to see this big area here where there's just little pieces where you can see through deeper into my hair. Just creating some lines for the eye to follow. Another thing that is really a good idea to keep in mind to is where the ends of tufts of hair sit so that you can really create this illusion that you've got this white lock sitting on top of a darker lock. So making sure that visually you've got a pencil line or something to fall at to make sure that you have a straight line in the end. So we'll just keep going around here. We're almost done. Again leaving some white pockets. I'm kind of feathering this edge since it's the hairline. Working around. And now that I look at it again, you know in this area, I can see I should have gone a little bit darker, so I'll go in her and add a level two. Add some level two over here. And the top of this starts as level two. Then we've got a darker strand in here. So it's just constant looking back and forth. Comparing, but not being too worried about being absolutely precise. This is still just our first pointillism portrait together. Once you get to be more like Charclosse or something, then you can worry about being perfectly accurate. Got a little, one last dark area up here. Her shadow. Then once you've gotten all of your four areas penned in, we'll move on and start to add in some of the few that are very dark areas in my hair. So we'll go onto value area six. We've got one last section of value to color in the hair, and that's value six. So, just using the chart again as reference, since my hair is pretty light there isn't too many areas that we will have to color in. Which makes it nice and fast. So just keeping everything we've done so far in mind, in terms of going in and kind of feathering the edges, creating those lines. It's visually tricking the eye. Don't forget to leave some small white spaces even in here where it's really dark. You see there's some little pockets of light that we want to keep, and that just helps create the illusion of individual strands of hair that catch the light differently. Looks like we've just got one last little area to do. And it's just right below. Ear is completely in shadow here. All right. So once you get all of the value six areas inked in, then we are going to move on from hair. Because now we have a base layer. And we're gonna leave it as it is now until we start to really go into the blending, when we do the blending for the whole piece. So we're gonna move on and next start to tackle the trickiest parts of the piece, which aren't that bad I promise, and that's the facial features.

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