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Lessons:16Length:2.1 hours
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6.2 Blending the Face

In this lesson, I’ll be showing you the two remaining steps with blending in the face. The first thing we’ll do is add a layer of extra dots where the value areas meet one another. This will create odd values like 3s and 5s. This way you get even gradations across your piece and the face will smooth out and become less graphic-looking. The second thing we’ll do as we work our way through the piece is push the value as needed. After the shirt is pushed to its full 9 value in areas, you begin to see how the face needs to get darker in certain areas. So we’ll be jumping round our piece using the photo reference as a guide to blend in the even value areas and push the value scale. Our aim is to have all the values, from 0 to 9, in the face when we’re finished.

6.2 Blending the Face

Now that we've put in the darkest darks into our shirt, you can really see that we need to push the value in the face and the hair to balance out those darks. So, we're gonna do this two ways. The first way is by filling in a lot of this white area on the face with the value one. So you can see in our photograph that there are really just a few white areas. Here along the forehead, and on the nose and on the upper lip. But in our drawing we've got quite a few white spaces left. So, we're gonna go in and add in those value one dots. This is going to not only help add depth to the face, but it's going to also help to blend smoothly into those value two areas. And this will make it a much more seamless transition for the eye. It'll really start to bring out the shape of the face as well. So just leaving a lot of room between your dots, using the photo as a guide for where the light areas should be. And you can already see it's made quite a difference there, really just smoothing and toning everything. I'm gonna be speeding up the video now as I continue working my way through the drawing, I'm gonna be pushing the values in the shadows and in the dark areas of my face. I'm also gonna be working on blending one value into the next by adding that extra layer of dots on top, like I showed you before. This way we'll get a really consistent flow from one value area to the next. So where's it's really dark now under my chin, we're gonna be pushing that value so that it really helps define the shape of my skull. You might feel like you have to push it quite a bit, but if you squint your eyes, you can see the area is actually very dark. So you'll see me jumping around from place to place. I'm just kind of comparing areas, seeing where the values are similar and where I need to keep pushing things. I'll always try and keep in mind where I've last been, so that I don't put my hand in it and accidentally smear the ink. Gonna push the value on the glasses now, to a full nine. This will really help to define the other value areas in the face now that we have something really dark to compare them to. If you're like me you might be nervous about going dark and putting in something like the glasses at a value nine will help give you a standard to compare other things too, and then it won't seem as frightening. So I've got large areas in the forehead that are quite light that I'll fill in And you wanna be a little careful as you go around the fine detail areas, like the eyes, and the nose, and the mouth. Especially when you go in and start to add the darks in the eyes, you'll really push the value in there so that they stand out. When we look at a portrait, the eyes are the first thing that we look at. So it's always a good idea to have those be as detailed and as striking as you can make them. I'm working my way down the nose, helping to define the shape of it, by pushing the value a little bit. You'll see I keep coming back to around the lip and the chin area. I keep meaning to push the value darker here. With the nose you just want to be careful that you don't push the value too much right around the nostril so that those dots don't become part of the shadow of the nostril Going back to define more of the jaw line now. Darkening the shadows in the ears. They're actually quite dark. Helps add a little definition to that side of the drawing as well. All right, so now that we've worked our way through the portrait I've really pushed the value scale from zero to nine. You can see it really balances much better now with the shirt below and the darkness there. So in the next lesson we're gonna take all of the skills that we just used doing the face to move on. And now we need to push the value in the hair a little bit because you can see we need to get some darker areas up in the hair to balance out the weight we have at the bottom.

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