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4.1 Ink the Even Values in the Face

We’re finally ready to start inking! We’ll start with the face, inking in the large areas of the forehead and cheeks. Use your gradation scale as a guide to make sure you don’t go too dark or keep it too light. We’ll be staying away from the small, detail areas of the face, as we’ll be covering those in later lessons.

4.1 Ink the Even Values in the Face

It'll probably take you a little bit of time, but you should now have all the valued areas penciled into your drawing. That means we can finally start to ink. So in the next few lessons, we'll be laying down ink in all the large areas of the face, the shirt and the hair. In addition to having your sketch, you'll also wanted to have the black and white photo and your gradation scale handy. Once you have all these and your pen, you're ready to start inking. Now that you have your sketch all divided up with your value areas, you're going to be working your way through and actually starting the inking process. So we're going to start with just the large areas of the face. I will be going through in depth in a later chapter how to do the eyes, the nose and the mouth to make sure that they come out as realistic as possible. And I'll also have a different separate lesson on the hair, because there are certain techniques you can use to make sure that hair actually reads as the fine structure that it is and not something heavy. So we're gonna start with the easiest one, which is actually the two on our value scale. So all of the areas that we marked off earlier as being two, we're just going to fill in the same value as on our value scale inside parameters of our area that we drew, inside those lines. So you're just gonna work your way through the drawing using the photos as reference. And since they're number twos, they're gonna go quite fast here. So you're welcome to go around the eyes, but we're just gonna leave those areas for later. Those tight detail areas like eyelashes, eyelids. The larger areas of skin are actually quite easy to go in and dot. Because for the most part, it's pretty smooth. So, I'm just moving around my pace and you're welcome to go at your own pace. Go wherever you want, following your little sort of grid system that you set up with all the markers and fill in all the number twos. I mentioned before that the way that I generally do my portraits, since I've done this so often is a bit more intuitive. I don't quite use this elaborate of a system with the value areas. But it's much more comfortable when you start out, because you don't have to worry about going to dark. You've already told yourself a value it's gonna be. And for the most part, you can fix almost any mistake that you make on here. Don't have to worry about going too dark and certainly not about being too light. And as we go along, I will be erasing my lines, so that you can get a better sense of what this drawing looks like. You wait til the end to erase your lines, since you're just so much lighter than mine isn't pretty much of an issue. Mine are just getting a little distracting and they'll show up In some areas it's darker than they're meant to be, because there's all the number underneath. Almost done here with all the twos. Obviously, doing people's different skin tones, you'll use more of certain values. So I'm a nice pasty white, so you get lots of two's in mine. [LAUGH] It also means you get to draw me, but faster. That's also why I put on the black shirt for the photo, just to make sure I gave you a little bit of work to do. I'm almost done here. She got little bit more in the ear. So now, we've laid down all of the ink in our value two areas of the face. So we're gonna move on and move to number four next. Now that we've got all of our two value areas inked in, we're gonna move up in our value scale and start inking in the four value areas. So we're going to do it just as before using our value scale to give us a guide as to how dark to go, how many dots we need and also looking at the photo for a reference. You can squint your eyes and see if it starts to match up like it should. We're just gonna do the same as we did last time, which is filling in within the confines of the area that we drew out and then also just making sure to get an even layer of dots throughout. And we're gonna leave the eyes, the nose and the mouth for closer to the end of this tutorial. Just a few tips and tricks that you can use in those small detail areas that will really make it pop. So we're just going along, you're welcome to jump from area to area, whatever order you like. I seem to actually go left to right. [LAUGH] So, I just keep darkening areas as we go along. It'll look a little choppy for these next few lessons as we just ink in the big areas, but we are gonna be doing a lot of smoothing out and blending right before the end. And that way, we will create the odd number value areas in our piece and that will create a much more seamless flow in our value scale. And that's really what tells the eye that it's a good work of art is if you have the whole scale zero to nine. So, I'm just going along leaving my hair for later. Got a little pin jaw. Sometimes think it be neat to leave a portrait, just like this where you jump a few values in the scale, might be neat to just see that kind of like old computer art topographical maps. Looks like we're almost done here. You're probably already looking at that black shirt and dreading what's to come, but don't forget we can do that trick to speed things up a little bit with the squiggles. That's why I taught it to you as well, cuz a lot of times you need that. People like to wear dark clothing for portraits or if you have a very dark background, it will save you a ton of time. So looking around, that looks like the last. Oh, right in the ear. The last little number four for us to do. So with that, we're gonna move on and do the value six.

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