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Lessons:15Length:31 minutes
Hand400
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2.1 The Tools You'll Need

In this lesson, you'll learn about the simple tools you need to get started, as well as some other materials you can use to enhance your lettering later on.

2.1 The Tools You'll Need

Hello, and welcome back. It's time to learn about the basic tools you need to start your lettering journey. There are millions of different pens that you can use for your hand lettering. And I recommend trying a few different ones to see what you feel the most comfortable with. Every pen will create different marks depending on the size and thickness of the nip, and each creates different styles. The good thing, though, is that no matter which tool you have, the principles of hand lettering stays exactly the same. The techniques you'll be learning in the course can be applied to any pen with a brush nip. You can even create the classic lettering style with cheaper children's felt tip. Here are a few common pens that I love and highly recommend. Tombow Dual Brush Pen. This is probably the most popular pen for hand lettering, and is great for beginners. You can get it in various colors, and it's widely available in art stores. It has a flexible brush-like tip that allows enough precision and control for thinner brush strokes. It also has a second tip that can be used for illustrative details. This is a great pen for medium and larger lettering works, and it's the pen I will be using in this course. Pentel Touch Sign Pen, another affordable option. This is a great pen for smaller lettering, and gives a greater amount of precision. The lines created by this pen are not as thick as the Tombow I've shown previously, but still gives a great brush stroke effect. Pentel Brush Pen. This is an infamous brush pen, thanks to its large brush nib and ability to create beautiful texture. The nib is flexible and very soft, so it gives different results to the previous two. It is a lot harder to control, so it's best for advanced users, and once you are more confident with lettering later down the line. This is also the most expensive of all the pens I've mentioned, as it's refillable and the only one that is water resistant. I've only mentioned three pens here, but the list is endless. Whichever pen you go for when practicing your hand lettering, be sure to go for a brush nib that allows you to create both thick and thin strokes. The other materials you need is paper and a pencil for sketching out your compositions later in this course. For your practicing and playing, scrap or printer paper is all you'll need, as you'll fill it quickly. For final lettering pieces, use thicker sketchbook or cartridge paper. Use paper with a smooth surface, so the pen glides smoothly over the surface without resistance. When practicing your letter forms, grid paper is a good tool, as well as the lettering practice sheets I have created for you to use as part of this course. You'll learn more about these in lesson three. Now you've chosen your pen, it's time to put it to paper. Join me in the next lesson to start creating your brush strokes.

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