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Lessons:15Length:31 minutes
Hand400
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4.3 Learn About the Baseline

To make your lettering really stand out, you'll need to learn how to apply flourishes to your work and make a unique piece of art.

4.3 Learn About the Baseline

Hello, welcome back. Hand letter increases can often look very static. While baselines and guides are necessary for learning the correct proportions of each letter, once you know these you can start experimenting. These ideas I'm about to teach you don't have to be applied if you'd like to stick to the very classic, traditional hand lettering style. But if you'd like a free flowing, modern, and dynamic approach, I recommend it. The first is to vary your baseline. Once your comfortable creating the alphabet you practiced and created in lesson four this will be an easy transition. As the letter forms themselves will come naturally to you. Again, letterring takes a lot of practice but I have no doubt you will be able to apply everything in this course to create a beautiful and unique hand lettered piece with confidence. So, I'm moving baseline. Here I've drawn out a curve baseline and I'll write out my word. Now this is automatically giving the letter some personality but it's still just the same baseline albeit at an angle. Now, I'll ignore consistent baseline completely. Here are the base lines for each of the individual letters. The base line has shifted up and down drastically for each letter. And the final result is a lot more dynamic. Here is the traditional method with a straight base line. You can clearly see the difference. The style is a lot more modern. And the difference with this hand lettering and calligraphy I talked about in the beginning is more apparent. The second method for creating dynamic type is to alter your flourishes from letter to letter. The basic shape of the letter will stay the same. But any loops and descender and ascenders and any swashes that you add can vary. If you want a looser style, vary the loops and swashes you add so they vary in size. Here, I have two letter g's, one with a larger loop, and I've also chosen not to join these up with the following letters. The b and the t could have had the same styling, so they would look like this. Instead I added a next loop on to the b so it didn't move with the t. The y could also be a copy of the gs but the loop is slightly different again. The final result is a lot looser and free flowing, so it totally depends on the style you are after with your lettering. Now you've learned about basic shapes and how to create letters, as well as techniques to add your own personal style of flourishes. It's time to apply them to a project. Join me in the next lesson to find out where to start.

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