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3.4 Develop the 3D Mockup in Photoshop Part 2

Continuing to edit our chocolate bar box in Photoshop, here we’ll add some extra effects to give the mockup more depth and realism. We’ll also weigh up the pros and cons of using Actions and Smart Objects to save your edits for future reuse.

3.4 Develop the 3D Mockup in Photoshop Part 2

Hi there. So we're still working on our chocolate bar mockup. It's looking really good so far. We've grafted the floss artwork onto the 3D shape. And we've added a plastic material effect to the snow-capped cutout showing more realistically how the chocolate inside the packet would be seen. Hm, but there's one thing missing with this mockup. And that's the fact that it's looking a bit flat. It's got no shadows around the outside of the packaging, which makes it look like it's floating in midair. We don't want that. So let's add a simple cast shadow. Click on the background layer at the bottom of the Layers panel and then select the Rectangle Tool. Let's create a long rectangle the rough width of the chocolate packet, which will sit on a layer above the background layer automatically. And make sure the color fill of the shape is set to black. Let's bring the opacity down to around 53%. Then head up to Edit > Transform > Distort, and let's adjust the position of the rectangle so that it sits neatly under the bottom of the packet. Just like that. Now head up to Filter > Blur > Gaussian Blur and set this to about 50.0 pixels as we did earlier in the previous lesson. Hit OK. Awesome, it's looking really good Now before we bring this section to a close, I want to share one more tip with you for creating product mockups in Photoshop. This is to add a bit of noise to the design to take away the overly polished digital look of the mockup. To do this, you want to select the layer containing the front image of the packaging and then head up to Filter > Noise > Add Noise. Increase the amount and click OK, fab. And that's it, a quick and simple product mockup which we began in Illustrator as a 3D vector shape and transformed into a realistic mockup in Photoshop by adding light, shadows, and textures. Our mockups looking great, but what if the client says that they want to see some different packaging designs mocked up in the same way. Like right now. There are two ways you can get more juice out of your mockup. The first is by recording your editing process as a Photoshop action. You can do this from the actions panel, but there are a couple of disadvantages to doing this that you need to be aware of. First, you have to have had the foresight to record the action before you start editing your mockup. Once you've done all the edits you can't simply save it as an action. Photoshop needs to recall the data as an action while you do it. The second drawback of using actions, is that it only really works for a mockup with a particular pose and dimensions. So say you want to tweak the mockup to make the packaging appear at a slightly different angle, the action will only allow you to reproduce this mockup exactly as it appears here. Now I've got nothing against actions, and I think for some tasks they're really super useful. But what I want to show you is how to use smart objects instead to feed a new artwork to the template without having to record your full set of edits. So let's take a look. Make sure you can see everything sitting in the Layers panel here. And let's track down the smallest object layer for the front face of the packaging. So from here, we can head up to File > Place. So inside the zip folder of chocolate bar artwork images that I shared with you earlier, you'll also find a folder of images of a different design called CHOCOLATE BAR PACKAGING_DESIGN 2. Let's head in there and choose FRONT_Design 2 and place. Let's resize that using Shift and get it to fill the page. And just to make sure we can't see any blue edges from the other design appearing, let's switch off the visibility of the background layer below. And then head up to File > Save. And then when we head back to our mockup document, there we go, it's updated, awesome. We can repeat this step with the side and front of the packaging by finding the layer containing the side artwork. If for any reason it is no longer a smart object you can right-click if you're on a PC, or Control click if you're using a Mac, on the name of the layer and choose Convert to Smart Object. And when you double-click to edit a layer it, will have its distorted angle. But that's no problem. You can place the artwork and Edit > Transform > Distort, and reshape the artwork until it matches the right angle and dimensions. Okay so let's double-click on the side smart objects. Then File > Place choose LEFT SIDE_Design 2 and Place. Re-size it, and then when you're ready go up to File > Save, cool. And finally with the top of the packet, so let's double-click on the smart objects. File > Place again, find the image called TOP_Design 2, and click Place. Re-size it to fill the space. And go to File > Save. Awesome, and you're done. So it's actually really simple to update your mockup file with a new design using smart objects. And you can also make this easy for others to open, edit too, simply by renaming the layers and making it bit more intuitive to use. So for example, we can double-click on the name of one of the smart object layers and type in something like double-click to insert front of packet here. I can rename the other smart object lays in the same way too. Then you can simply File > Save your Photoshop file and share it with someone else. So it's super easy. Great work this lesson guys. In the next section of the course we're going to take our product mockup skills one step further and look at some more specific techniques for adding cool details to your mockups. Like folds, creases, texture, and even bringing in a human subject to your designs. So stick around, you won't want to miss those tips. I'll see you there.

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