Unlimited PS Actions, graphics, videos & courses! Unlimited asset downloads! From $16.50/m
by
Lessons:13Length:1.7 hours
  • Overview
  • Transcript

2.7 Global Swatches and Gradients

In this lesson we’ll look at global swatches. You'll discover the benefits they offer when used in combination with certain types of gradients.

2.7 Global Swatches and Gradients

[MUSIC] Let's move along. The next one, gradients. Now this is gonna be really cool because I love creating things with gradients. We looked at them briefly earlier. So how you can apply gradients with black and white and using that multiply blending mode. So let's just go and create a few squares with the rectangle tool. In fact, we're not gonna create squares. We're gonna create a spiral because there's something else that I'd really like to show you, That is a lot of fun once you know it. So we will just double click the stroke from the bottom of the toolbar and we'll give this a black stroke. Now I'm just going to increase that weight slightly, So you can see exactly what I'm doing. And we'll round off that corner as well. So if we click the gradient panel on the right, And typically it would add that default black to white gradient. Now what you can do is you can go in, double-click on a swatch on this slider, and just pick two different colors. Now I'm doing this on one shape. If you have a complex illustration or a graphic of some description that has, or if you had multiple shapes like in the logos we looked at earlier, and they all used the same or similar gradient. And do you know what? I want to change this orange to a blue color. You've got to double-click this, go and find your blue color. That's not the right blue color. Okay, I'll go into the swatch panel. Okay, I've got to fine tune my blue. Then I've got to go back into the gradient panel, go back here and click the newer version. That's not right. Back into the swatch panel. You see, it's this back and forth. You have to go into the swatch, edit the swatch, go back into the gradient panel. So what I would recommend is when you're starting to create a gradient and you know that you're gonna have two colors in it, in this case it's going to be green and blue. Just create two swatches and make sure you check the box marked global. Now what global means is that any instance of this color in your document, if you ever go back into this swatch just by double-clicking it in the swatch panel and you change this global color, it will update every instance of that color in your document. And you can see that it's a global swatch because it adds this little white tag in the corner. So let's go and create a square. And we'll go and create a star as well. And we're also going to go into our gradient panel, double-click on this green, and we're going to add our new green with our global swatch that we created. And I'm also going to double-click and turn this blue swatch into a global swatch as well. Now I'm going to go back into the gradient panel and just click that gradient swatch. So now what happens is I can go back to the swatch panel, and if I think I just want to change the green color, I can simply load that swatch, turn on preview, and as I change this you can see it updates every instance of this in real time. There we go, and I quite like purple, so I'm going to keep that. But if I want to change the blue as well, I simply just load up that swatch, turn on preview, and I can start adjusting it all in real time. So that's cool. That is gradients with swatches and global swatches. So for me personally most things I do in Illustrator, I just make global swatches because it's just so much easier if I do something. If I'm working on logo or something and I get so far down the line and I think, I just want to change the color. I just simply change the swatch, I don't have to manually go back in and update every instance of green and change it to purple, for example. Now if I select this funky looking spiral that I've created. At the moment we can go to the gradient panel and see that the gradient runs from blue to purple. So let's adjust this, we'll bring the blue into the middle, and we'll click on our purple swatch and hold ALT, and it will create a copy and we'll drag that to the other end. So the gradient stroke at the moment is set to the one on the left, apply gradient within stroke. And this is the default option. And it goes from literally from left to right on your shape as we're looking at it, so purple to blue to purple. If we change this to the middle option, apply the gradient along the stroke, it will go from one end to the other, and follow the path of the stroke. So it now runs from purple, which is our swatch on the left, and this runs into blue, Which then runs into purple at the end. So super, super useful. But then you can also change this one at the end to apply a gradient across the stroke. And instead of following the path of the stroke, what it will do is it will run across the width of the stroke. So we have purple going to blue going to purple again. And of course we can go back in here, in the gradient slider, and we can adjust how much purple and how much blue there is by adjusting these little mid points here. If you wanted a thinner glow down the middle, we could double-click that blue and add a different color. So those are a few different ways that you can control the stroke of the gradient so we can have it running from left to right, following the path of the stroke, or running across the width of the stroke.

Back to the top