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4.1 You, the Typography ‘Artist’

Let's take a look at how typography can inspire you as an artist and what other things you can focus on to aid your learning.

4.1 You, the Typography ‘Artist’

Hi guys, welcome to the final lesson in this tuts+ course, The Art of Typography. Well this isn't so much a lesson as more of a summary of all of the skills and knowledge that you've picked up on the course. And before we say goodbye, I also want to share with you some tips and pointers for how you can continue to develop as a typography artist. Firstly, a big congratulations is in order. You completed the course and tackled a really broad range of topics and projects along the way. You can now impress your friends of your knowledge about good old Gutenberg and the printing revolution that he triggered and connect that with your new found type setting skills which you can use to type set text for books and magazines. You can also call yourself a true modernist now that you know about the experimental impact that the international style had on traditional typography in the 20th century. And hopefully, you will never ever forget now about using grids to give structure to your typography. And you'll also feel appreciative of a strong sans serif when you come to design poster layouts. In case your friends think that your typographic skills are a little bit old hat, you can remind them that you now also know about the world of digital typography, including the role that typography plays in website design and digital typeface design. And you could also vectorize and digitize your very own fonts. So we really have covered a very broad spectrum of topics in this course and I really hope that at least one of the aspects that we've covered, whether that's type setting, layout design, or type design has captured your imagination and convinced you to look into this topic further. And they are, of course, other aspects to typography which we haven't even covered in this course. It's such a big topic. Such as logo design for example. And these branches always seem to be discovered by you. Now you have this broad foundation of typographic knowledge and practice, you can look to specialize in something which is going to appeal to you personally. So, where can you go, from here? What you always need to remember is the emphasis of this course, that typography is an art and as a result it's a really creative field to get involved in. Sure, there are rules, we know that now. But ultimately typography will only evolve if it continues to grow and respond to the taste and needs of each new era. This digital era that we're living in now is an amazingly creative time to get involved in typography. But there's also a whole subculture of artists and designers who are looking to give print typography a new lease of life. If you're interested in typography in print, these are just some of the topics and spin off industries that you can look up and find out more about. Something to definitely take a good look at is Letterpress. Letterpress Printing has seen a revival in the last decade, and there are now lots of studios and freelancers who specialize entirely in producing beautiful Letterpress printed items like cards, posters, menus, and branded media. Letterpress adds a very unique, special touch to typography, and I would recommend that you look more into the Letterpress resurgence that's going on at the moment if you want to see how traditional typography is being used in a modern, hip way. We've also got publishing design. After a scary few years in the wilderness, print book design is once again finding its feet and carving out a new niche for itself in the publishing market. While e-books are heading off on their own digital path, printed books are looking back to traditional production techniques to bring a very special touch to their covers and interior designs. Just take a look at Cora Lee Bickford's most beautiful designs for Penguin's cloth bound classics to see just one example of how the publishing industry is meeting demand for nostalgic unique items that consumers can treasure forever. And classic vintage inspired typography is a huge part of that. If you think that online typography is going to float your boat instead, you're spoiled for choice. Digital typography is a young but quickly expanding branch of typography, and there are lots of ways that you can develop your interest. An easy peasy thing to do is to find websites that feature typographic designs that you love and research the digital agencies that created them. You'll probably find that handful of agencies created many websites that share the look that you admire. And if you're feeling bold, get in touch with the designers of these agencies, and you never know they might share some valuable advice with you about getting started in digital design. If there's something that you really love about a website's typography you can also use the inspect element function on your browser to delve into the details. You can discover the web fonts used by the designer and the coding that they applied to achieve that specific typographic effect. One more thing to serious look into if you're interested in digital typography is look into responsive design and the impact that this is having on how designers create typographic layouts for different devices on the web. Don't know where to get started on responsive design? Well take a look at Jason Pamental's book on responsive typography, which is pretty up to date, it was published just last year. Jason's also got a supporting website which is rwt.io, which has some extra resources, codes, and also an events list for workshops, etc., so check that out, too. So that's just a few ideas to get you going, and send you off on your own personalized typographic adventure. Stick around for the next video, I'm just going to pull together some of the key skills and ideas that we've covered during the course which you can now use to become your very own typography artist.

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