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2.2 Typography Skills: Book Typesetting

In this project-based lesson you’ll learn how to borrow from traditional typesetting techniques and apply them to book design today. We’ll also look at some of the typographic techniques required for setting large bodies of text.

2.2 Typography Skills: Book Typesetting

Hi guy's. So in the last lesson you met Mr. Gutenberg who we can credit with sparking the printing revolution in Europe and this explosion in typography that followed it. The first items to be treasured for their printed typography were books, and it was really inside of these books where typographic rules and ideas were played out. In the design world now, typesetting is a whole field in itself and there is specialist typesetters whose whole work is based around perfecting the typography that you can find inside the pages of say, the latest best selling novel. So in honor of Gutenberg and typesetters today, in this lesson we're going to look at how you can typeset a book spread, which is two facing pages inside of a book. For this lesson, if you want to follow along, you're going to need to open up Adobe InDesign, so pause the video and do that now. I'll be waiting for you. Okay, so here we are with InDesign opened up and you probably have this welcome window waiting for you. So from here you can choose Document from under the Create New menu. So click that or if you don't have your welcome window, go up the File menu at the top of the workspace, and choose New, and then select Document. Now, we want to create a traditional book for print, so let's keep the intent of the document set to Print. Keep Facing Pages checked, and increase the Number of Pages to 3. Now under Page Size, I have this custom page size already saved, called B-Format Paperback. And this is standard trade page size for printed books. But you can simply enter the correct width and height to create that same B-Format size. So let's type in 130 mm for the Width and 198 mm for the Height. Your margins are going to be really important, as they're going to help guide the position of your blocks of texts. And you want to allow for the book to be bound in the middle of each spread which, is on the inside edge of the page. So to make sure your typesetting doesn't get sucked into that bind, make the inside margin a bit more generous than the outside. So, let's set the Inside Margin to 15 mm, one five millimeters. And the Outside to 13 mm, one three millimeters. It also makes sense to make the bottom margin more generous than the top. So this is gonna give you a bit more space for placing your page numbers beneath the block of text. So let's set the Bottom margin to 16 mm, one six, and the Top margin to 14 mm, one four. Most printers will want you to include a bleed on your exported book pages and this is going to be essential, especially if you're printing anything with color or graphics that's going to go up to the edge of the page. But what you won't need is a bleed on the inside edge of the page, as this is the edge that is going to be sucked into the binding of the book and not be visible at all when the book is printed, and bound, and finished. So with that in mind, set the Bleed to 3 mm on all of the edges except the Inside, which you can leave at 0. Okay, great, now you're ready to create your new document. So head up and click OK. So here you've got your three-page document and this is going to be the first page of a sample chapter, followed by a two-page spread continuing that chapter. I'm sure you're thinking hang on, this is a bit short for a book, but we're just going to show you the basics of typesetting and use this short document to demonstrate the process to you. And we're not going to bother with setting up things like master pages and book files. That's a bit more of an advanced step for you to explore further later on, if you want to learn more about typesetting. So let's dive right in with the typesetting. First step, you'll need to mark out where your blocks of text are going to sit. You already have a basic grid marked out by the margins on the pages, but we can add to this a little more with guidelines. So head up to the first page of the document, and from the top ruler, go up to View and Show Rulers if you can't see your rulers. Click and drag a guideline right onto the page, and you wanna pull that guideline down to 78.4 millimeters. Now, let's hop down to the next spread of your document. And again pull down a guide onto the left-hand page, this time letting it sit 23.3 millimeters. And then another guide right down to 172.7 millimeters. Drag your mouse over both the guides on the page and go to Edit, Copy, and then back into Edit and Paste. And then drag them over into the same position onto the right hand page of the spread. Before you drop in some text onto the page, you're going to need to set up some text frames for the text to sit in. So go back up to the first page of the document and then head over to the tools panel at the left-hand side of the workspace and select the type tool, or just hit T on your keyboard. Now drag onto the page with your mouse to create a text frame that fits just perfectly within the margins and the guidelines. Okay that's looking really great. Now let's do the same on the spread below, making the frames a little bit bigger to meet those guidelines at the top and the bottom of the page. And when you got two text frames there, head back up to page one and now you need to make sure that your text frames are linked to each other, which is going to allow the text to flow across. So go down to the bottom right of the first text frame and click on the little white square to pick up a text thread. And then click and drop it onto the frame on page two. Just like that. Okay, great and repeat that again with that text frame, picking up the thread and then linking it to the frame on page three. Now typesetting books is all about being really organized, and being very precise about where your text is going to sit and how it's going to be formatted. What makes typesetting look really good is consistency and making sure that your text is going to be legible and have lot's of breathing space around the edges of your text blocks. So before you drop your text into your InDesign document, you can take some steps toward pairing your pages for typesetting. We've just done that first step, which is making sure that we have a grid and having text frames ready to receive the text. The next step is to apply uniform formatting across your linked text frames. And this formatting will then apply to any text that you drop into the frames. So all the hard work will already be done for you. Okay, so let's head back up to the first page and then sit your type tool cursor in that first text frame. Now head up to the top left corner of your work space and you can see that all these different buttons and menus for formatting typography have suddenly appeared. And this is what we call the Character Formatting Controls panel. So the first thing to do is to pick your font. In the previous lesson, I mentioned a few classic typefaces that have been in use for centuries. And books are still a very classic print format, so a traditional tried and tested font is going to look really, really, fantastic for your typesetting. So let's scroll down to see in the Font menu and let's choose Adobe Caslon Pro, which is a slightly updated, more polished version of the original Caslon typeface. And it's one of my favorite fonts to use. I think it's really, really nice. So now what you want to do is to choose your font size, which is measured in points. And remember that your text has to be easy to read in large blocks of text. So you don't wanna go to small but any thing too big is not going to look right either. I usually think that 10 points is a pretty good size to use, especially if you then increase the leading to a more generous 13 points, which is going to give your lines of text a bit more breathing space. You can also add some extra typographic features like say, a first line left indent, which I can put at 2 mm, and that's just gonna push the first line of text of each paragraph a little bit to the right. And if you switch to the Paragraph Formatting Controls panel by clicking on this little paragraph icon over the left of the screen, you can also tell InDesign to not hyphenate your text by deselecting the Hyphenate check box. Okay, so now that's done. You're going to need some text for your book. Most typesetters probably work from a manuscript that's been put together in Word or Pages, but here we're just going to drop in some copied text from the Internet. So head over to the website address that's up on the screen now. This is gonna take you to the first chapter of Jane Austin's classic novel, Pride and Prejudice. So find your way through and then highlight the body text for that first chapter and copy it. When you return to InDesign, make sure that your cursor is inside that first text frame on page one. And then simply go up to Edit and Paste in your text and tada! Your first chapter is pasted in and all the text is formatted with the settings that you applied earlier, and now it's just a case of embellishing things. You can add a bit of typographic flare, we'll say a drop cap, which you can set from up here at the top of the workspace. And you can add things like page numbers and running headers and chapter headings, which here you can see that I've added in another document I created a bit earlier. So that's your really concise introduction to typesetting books and the sort of typographic skills that you need to make your typesetting look really great, like pre-preparing margins and grids, linking your text frames, and applying a classic elegant typeface like Caslon at a size and leading that's going to be easy to read and look really beautiful. So it's really great work, guys. Save your document, if you want to come back to it for reference, by going up to File and Save As. We won't be coming back to this document again in the course, but it's always handy to keep hold of when you come to typeset your own books in the future. In the next lesson, we'll be moving forward in time and looking at how a group of Swiss designers changed the face of typography forever. So look forward to that, and I'll see you over in the next lesson.

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