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Lessons:15Length:1.7 hours
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2.3 Typing With a Tablet

The pressure-sensitive surface and stylus are great for drawing or painting, but what if you need to enter text? In this lesson we review two strategies that let you forget your keyboard and use the tablet for text entry.

2.3 Typing With a Tablet

Hello everybody, Kirk Nelson here, welcome back to Mastering the Walking Tablet with Photoshop. This is lesson 2.3 on Typing with a Tablet. So we've talked quite a bit about using the tablet as a pointing device in Photoshop. But what happens when we need to input some text? What happens when we need to type something? Now, that doesn't happen all that often when we are working in Photoshop, but it does happen. Like if we were to go to File > New, we can name the layer. But if we've just a got a pointer, that's a little difficult to do. Now naturally, we can reach over and type on the keyboard, but what if that's not within reach? What if that's not convenient? Isn't there anything else we can do? Well, you may have noticed in the last lesson we assigned one of our express keys to be an input panel and that's what we're gonna over now. You press that and we get this panel that comes up that can actually read handwriting. So let's pick the Untitled 1, that's in there and we'll just draw through it and that deletes it. and let's call this [SOUND] Typing with a Tablet. So it recognized each of those words and I can hit insert. Now that's the name of my new file, Typing with a Tablet. And there's several more things that we can do with that. Let's bring that back up. Now, not only can it recognize handwriting, it even has some rudimentary editing capabilities. Say, for instance, it recognized it as table t instead of tablet. You can connect the two together by just a little swoop underneath there. And then, if we want to split them, tab let, for instance, we can delete by just drawing through, and then we can edit individually just by tapping on them. And on each individual letter, we can draw new letters to make entirely new words. [BLANK_AUDIO] This panel is movable. It can be docked to one side or another. I prefer just having it disappear completely. Mostly because I just do screen captures and if you just dock it, it tends to have a little edge of it visible on the screen still. But I like to be able to dock it to and from by just hitting that button. Now handwriting isn't all that it can do. It also has a keyboard that you can type with. Now this is very much like texting, just with a tablet. Now if it feels a little bit odd tapping on these keys with your stylus, you can always use the touch as well. And that feels a little bit more natural, and as you start typing you'll get suggestions at the top of the box for auto completion. The other keys are also available like Ctrl, Alt, even the Window key, Caps Lock, Tab, Escape. They're all here in case you actually need to touch them and you don't want to reach for the keyboard. So typing with a tablet, is it more efficient than using your keyboard? Not even close. But it is helpful. I'm not saying to throw away your keyboard, I'm saying, just know that it's there, and have that available. Perhaps you're comfortable drawing in a reclined position. Maybe you've got your feet up. Maybe you're sitting on your couch in front of your fireplace, with your laptop and your tablet. And it's not convenient to reach up and type on your keyboard. You just want to give a layer a special name. That's when you would use the text entry on the tablet. It's not a very robust or powerful feature, but its certainly is a convenient feature. So that concludes Chapter Two on the Basic use of the Tablet. Next chapter, Chapter Three, we'll begin working with the tablet in Photoshop.

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