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3.5 Fills, Fill Types, Multiple Fills

There are lots of really interesting things you can do with Gravit’s fill system. Not only does it have a number of different fill types and blend modes, it also has the ability to stack multiple fills onto a single object. In this lesson we’ll go through how to use this fill system.

3.5 Fills, Fill Types, Multiple Fills

Welcome back to Gravit Designer Quick Start. In this lesson, we're gonna be checking out the fill system in Gravit Designer. So we're gonna start by just drawing a shape that we can apply some fills to. And go through and look at all the different things that the system has to offer. So your fill section, as we've seen so far in passing in previous lessons, is down here. And right now, we just have one fill that's showing on our current shape. The first thing you're probably gonna want to know in any graphics application is how to change the fill color. Well, to do that, this is your current color, this circle here, so you click on that. And that's gonna give you this color selector that you can choose from. The color selection tools in Gravit are absolutely fantastic. The first thing that you've got is just the basics, you have the ability to select a color from a typical color picker, we have a hue slider. And then you have the ability to set your saturation and hue value by clicking and dragging up around here. Easy access to hex codes, as well as RGBA codes, and the ability to set the opacity of your color here as well. And on the note of opacity, you also have the ability to set the opacity of the color on this slider here. Down here in this section, you've got four different panels to help you choose colors, and these are incredibly useful. You just have a basic selection of colors here, just easy to just jump in, and grab any one of these colors to get you started. But you also have a swatches area, here, you can add your own custom selection of colors. So let's say I pick out a variant orange that I really like, and I wanna be able to access it anytime. Then I can add this swatch to this document's color palette. If I like this color so much that I wanna have it available in every document I work with, then I could also add it to my global color palette. Another really fantastic tool here is this in use section. What this is gonna do is pick up all of the colors that are currently in your document, and show them to you right here. So if I just start adding in some extra shapes, and let's say I go with a greenish color, for example. And sorry about the clashing color, hope it doesn't hurt your eyes too much. And then we'll put something else in, go with a pink. You can see down here, That as I add these additional colors, they're starting to fill up this in use section. This makes it really, really easy once you finally get the perfect color on one part of your design, to then go through, select a whole bunch of other elements in your design. And then quickly and easily apply a matching color to it. Just get rid of these two for now. And then in this fourth section, this is also really fantastic. This gives you easy access to modified versions of the color that you're currently using. So let's say I want to create, Something that looks like a bit of shadow at the bottom of this square, it's just gonna be very rough. I can go into the mixer, and I can chose a shade of the color that I'm currently using. So if you're unfamiliar with these terms, what's happened with this color here is, a bit of black has been mixed into my existing orange color to give us a shade. If I undid that, And went back to one of these colors, a tint, add some white into the base color, and tones add some gray into the base color. So if I wanted this to be lighter instead, then I could use a tint. So this can really help to speed the process along of adding in shadows and highlights when you're creating illustrations, very, very useful. And so I'm just gonna get rid of that extra shape for now. So we can go back to looking at the different types of fills that we have to work with. So now we've covered all of the different types of color selection tools that are in here. Except for one more thing, and that is, this is your color picker. So you grab this, and you can move this anywhere around the canvas to help you select a new color. Now, up along the top here, we have a selection of different types of fills beyond just flat color fill. So I've got three different types of gradients, first up is linear gradient, so I've got a first color set on the left here. We can change the second color by selecting it and just picking out a new color. The angle of the gradient can be adjusted on the canvas here. It has two stops on the gradient by default, but you can add new stops to the gradient by hovering your mouse over the gradient at the position that you want to add a new stop. You then click and drag that stop, and you can change its color. By the way, you'll notice that as I added in a new color into this gradient, before this mixes line along the bottom here, I only had a single color here showing up. Now that it's got multiple colors to work with, it's offering us different mixes of those two colors. So that's just another really useful color selection tool in there. And if you want to get rid of a color stop, just come up here, grab the color stop with your mouse, and just drag it downwards and off of the gradient that shows along the top here. Two other types of gradients are radio gradient, which works the same way as the last one, but this one is circular, so you can change the origin of the gradient. And with these two handles here, you can also mess around with the angle of the gradient. Next up is the angular gradient, again, this is a lot like the radial gradient, you can move it around, You can change where the stops are on the outside of the radius, and you can change where that division in the radial gradient is going to fall. So that covers all three of our gradient types, next up, we have texture. Now, with this type of fill, you can actually bring in an image texture that you've created externally. So for example, I bring in this image of a tiling floor. From here I can choose whether I want this image to fill the space, fit to the space, stretch, or tile. So If we fill it, it's just going to try and take up the entire rectangle. If we fit, then it's going to be able to leave some empty gaps to make sure that the entire image fits inside the shape. If we stretch it, then no matter what size the shape is, it's going to modify that image so that it always stretches to fill it completely. And if we tile the shape, then we can change how large the shape appears. And it's always just gonna repeat from left to right and tile that image in there. After that, we've got noise, we can't see that right now, and that's because we just need to change the type of noise. So we have black noise, white noise, and colored noise, and noise is most useful when it's made transparent, and it's blended in with something that's behind it. So we'll have a little bit more of a look at that shortly, and then we also have the background fill type. And I'm actually just gonna show you how to use the background fill a little bit later. This is one of those tools that's easier shown than explained verbally. So we're just gonna go back and set this to one of our previous colors, because the next thing that I want to show you is the multiple fill system. So right now we've got one fill on our shape, and we can actually hide that fill if we want to. But this fill section here works a lot like the layers section, where you have a bunch of things that can stack on top of each other. If we want to add an additional fill, all we have to do it hit this little button here. And now we have another fill that's sitting on top of our existing fill, so if I hide that, there's our existing fill. Now we can start to do some interesting things, for example, I mentioned that noise has the best effect when it's used over the top of something else. So we've just put some colored noise on top of our existing orange fill. So I'm just gonna change that to, actually, let's go with black noise. And now what I'm gonna do is start to play with the blending modes. We've got a really great selection of blending modes that you can use to take these fills and combine them in with one another. So let's have a little play with this, let's try overlay. And then you can see that it's overlaid that noise on top of our underlying orange fill. And I can change the opacity so that it's not quite so stark, drop that even further again. And now we've got just some subtle noise giving some texture to our orange background. So we'll just show and hide that to show the difference between having this on or off. And we can have as many different fills here as we want, so perhaps I'll, Put the tiling texture in that I used before, let's say I'll stretch it. I'm gonna change its blending mode. So that it becomes a kind of subtle inclusion in there. And these other fills remain editable, so at any time, I can come in here and I can change the way that this looks to try to change the overall appearance of this shape that I'm working on. And then if I want, I can also put a gradient over the entire thing, and I can do something like setting the opacity in the center of this gradient all the way down to zero. Just change that color to black as well. So then we get kind of a vignette effect over the top of our shape. Now I'm just sort of throwing together some random things to show you how this all works. But with some time and attention put into this, you can create some really exceptional graphics. If you need to select one of these fills, just place your cursor on the left edge until you see this little hand icon, and then click, then that will select the fill. And there you can delete the fill if you need to, you can also go into some advanced fill settings. These two options are to determine how your fills are gonna work on a shape that has holes inside of it. Just gonna hide this for a second, and going to make a shape with a hole inside it. Now if I select this fill, go into the advanced settings, and choose fill holes. Now that whole thing is gonna get filled in, so that's what that advanced setting does for you. And you can also drag and drop any of these fields to change what order they're stacked in. So let's say I want my noise to be placed above my image texture, then I can just drag it and drop it into the position in the stack that I need it to be. And then if I need to delete a fill, just select it in the same way, and hit the little Delete icon here. Now, the only the type of fill that we didn't cover yet is the background fill type. It's not immediately obvious what the background fill is for, because if I draw another shape, That's just duplicated the fills that we had on our previous shapes, so I'm just gonna get rid of those. And we choose background fill, it makes it look like that all that happens is the shape disappears, but the shape is still there. The purpose of this background fill option is to let you make shapes that are specifically designed to put effects on top of objects that are below this shape. This actually ties into the effects section down here, which we're gonna look at in a couple of lessons' time. But just to give you a quick example so you know what background fill is for, I could add a color adjustment effect. And now I can change the hue of everything that's behind this object that has the background fill option applied to it. If we had a different type of fill, then we wouldn't be able to see the effect of this color adjustment on the items that are below this shape. So that wraps up everything you need to know about the fill system in Gravit Designer. In the next lesson, we're gonna move on to checking out the border system. The border system is very much like the fill system, in that you can have multiple borders stacked on top of each other. So we're gonna check that out, and some of the specific things to borders in Gravit Designer, in the next lesson, I'll see you there. I could add a color adjustment effect. And now I can change the hue. Of everything that's behind this object that has the background fill option applied to it. If we had a different type of fill, then we wouldn't be able to see the effect of this color adjustment, On the items that are below this shape. So that wraps up everything you need to know about the fill system in Gravit Designer. In the next lesson, we're gonna move on to checking out the border system. The border system is very much like the fill system, in that you can have multiple borders stacked on top of each other. So we're gonna check that out and some of the, so we're gonna check that out and some of the specific features. So we're gonna check that out and some of the specific things to borders in Gravit Designer in the next lesson, I'll see you there.

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