Unlimited PS Actions, graphics, videos & courses! Unlimited asset downloads! From $16.50/m
by
Lessons:8Length:49 minutes
140786 adam noonan thumbnail cinema 4d 02 400x277px 102417
  • Overview
  • Transcript

3.4 Exporting to After Effects

In this lesson you will learn how to export your animation from Cinema 4D. You will also learn how you can combine your paint stroke animation with some simple animations in Adobe After Effects.

3.4 Exporting to After Effects

Hi, everyone and welcome back to the creating paint strokes course. In this lesson, we'll be going through how we can export our paint strokes animation and use it in programs such as After Effects. So here we just have another example of some paint strokes where I've made a couple more strokes in the scene. Just a few more colors, just to create a little bit more variety to the animation. From here, we can head over to the Edit Render Settings button, and you'll see all the options you'll need to adjust your render. For this animation, we'll want to go for the dimensions here which is 2568 by 1440 pixels. And over here in Save, you want to make sure that you've selected a destination for your render files. You’ll also want to change the format to PNG here, so select PNG. And also tick the Alpha Channel box. Once everything is setup here, just simply click on the Render button and wait for the animation to finish. When we have our sequence of images ready, we'll need to import them into After Effects. So here you can see that I've already imported the Photoshop file to the scene which includes a logo and a background. Or you can do this by simply dragging and dropping our Photoshop files here and make sure that you choose edit their styles. Once you've done that, just simply double-click on the composition, and you can see all our Photoshop that is here. So it consists of a border, a logo, a circle, and a background. So now that we've done that, we'll want to import our image sequence by going to File > Import > File, select all of the images. Click on PNG sequence and Import. From there, you'll want to drag and drop it into our composition like so. And if we click on the Play button here, you can see that we've got a lovely animation on top of our Photoshop file which is kinda cool. And from there, what we'll want to do is we can actually edit our animation just to make it a little more dynamic. So just open up the Transform here. And what we can do from here is we can make our animation a little bit bigger. In fact, let's make it significantly bigger. Create a key frame on the first key frame and let's make this 145%. So now our animation is a lot bigger and we'll want to make it slowly come down and slowly get smaller, so let's say at about this point here, let's make it 25. Let's make another key frame 107.5% and then at 2 seconds, I want it to bring it all the way back down to its original size which is 100%. Now we can change the rotation as well. So let's go back to the first key frame and from there let's make it go to minus 33 degrees. And then at about 1 second here we can turn it back to its original orientation at 0. So it sort of starts really big and then slowly sort of turns around here which is kinda cool. Next, we also want to get rid of these bits here, these artifacts here. So we can do that by changing the opacity settings, so let's say about this point here. So just as it's that we want it to disappear. So about one point here, let's make a key frame. So it'll be 100% here, and in fact, let's make a key frame here as well. So 100% all the way through up until 2 seconds, so we'll make a key frame here and make it disappear at 0. So you'll see here now that from this point at this key frame, and between here and here it sort of disappears. So if you want a more subtler disappearance, you can bring the key frames further apart so that it sort of disappears quite slowly. So that's kinda cool. So that's our animation done. We'll also want to edit our Photoshop file a little bit so that it fits the animation a little bit more. So the first thing that we'll want to do is edit the border. And we can do this by creating a effects here. So let's try and find Radial Wipe. So once you've found Radial Wipe, just drag and drop it into border. And if we go to Effects > Radial Wipe, we can change the settings here. So let's go to Transition Completion and that's about 1.8 seconds. So around this point here, we'll create a new key frame and we want the transition completion at 100%. So what this means is up until this point, the circle is gone and then at 2 seconds, we'll want it to come back in, so we change the transition completion from 100 to 0. So now, following our animation, it sort of circles around with our paint strokes until the circle is complete, which is kinda cool. Next, we can also make it fit in with our paint strokes a little bit more by adding some sort of turbulent displace. So let's go to Turbulent Displace and we can fiddle about with these settings here under Effects > Turbulent Displace. So fill in the same key frame. So at 1.8 we can make the amount here, say about 100. So you can see as we draw in our border, it's really sorta squiggly, kinda like our paint strokes. But we want it to disappear or at least get back to normal around the 2 second mark. So let's go to 0 with the amount here. So it slowly sort of transitions from really squiggly to not at all. So that's our border done. The next thing that we'll want to do is we'll want to edit our circle here. So let's go over here and at about the one point, let's see about this point here. Let's bring the scale to 0. So we want it to move from the center of our logo at about 1.15 seconds. Let's bring it back in at 100, so it sort of moves. We didn't create any key frames, so 1.7, let's create a key frame for scale. So 0 and then at 1.15, create another key frame and bring it back to 100. So now that we've got two key frames here, you can see that the circle starts off really small, then moves into the center of our screen like that. Cool, we can also add the turbulent displace to our circle here as well. And also, we can also add a bit of opacity just as we did before but let's keep it this for now. We can also change the logo, so let's make our logo animated a little bit. Just make it more interesting, so let's add a rotation to our animation, to our logo. So let's say at about, if we follow the border key frames so about 1.8, let's make the rotation at about 150. So we want the rotation to follow our paint strokes. And then at 2 seconds let’s bring it back to 0. So you can see now that it sort of rotates as our paint strokes animate as well. And we can also add opacity to this too, just to make it a little bit more interesting. So add a key frame, so from 0 and at 2 seconds, let's bring it back up to 100. So we can also make our composition settings, so currently our animation is 30 seconds. Let's bring it down to three seconds instead. And now, if we hit Play in our Preview button, you can see that our animation fits, or our PSD animation fits with our original paint strokes animation. And there we have it, so that's it for this lesson. In the next lesson, we'll go through what we've learned over the course of the whole project and summarize all the different techniques that we've used to create the animated paint strokes. See you all there.

Back to the top