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2.4 Flip It: Mirror the Portrait

Save time by duplicating and flipping a portrait... but learn how to make it look unique.

2.4 Flip It: Mirror the Portrait

Hey, all! Welcome back to an Introduction to Vector Line Art. My name is Sharon Mellon, and in this lesson I'm going to show you how to mirror your portrait so it duplicates the eye and face shape. To save time with line art, if you've got an element which is symmetrical, and mirror it and tweak it, you mirror it to save time, and then tweak it to avoid it looking like a duplicate. With a portrait which is face on, you can more or less mirror the whole portrait. However, to avoid this portrait looking too mirrored, I'm just going to flip the face shape and the eye area. The lips and the nose are drawn as complete entities, and they're fine as they are. So let's start with a face shape. First locate the shape and the line art layer folder and cut it. I'm going to paste it in front in a new layer. So I'm just dealing with the face shape. This avoids confusion with any other shapes on my part. You can always move the shape back into the line art folder when you're done. With the face shape selected, to go to Object>transform>reflect. Select Vertical as the axis, and then click on Copy. This duplicates the face shape and flips it at the same time. With the duplicate shaped, use the arrow keys to nudge the shape into place so you've got it lined up to cover the entire face area. As I've created these shapes using chunky line art, therefore it's a compound path rather than to follow shapes. I'm going to need to be creative to combine these shapes together. If I was to reunite these shapes together I'd get exactly what you see in front of you. Two outlines of a shape and a chunky line art style. We're wanting to get rid of those lines in the center so we're just left with the chunky line art outline of the face. What I need to do is to release the compound paths and deal with the overall large shape and smaller shape, and then remove them from one another to create the chunky line art. Once a compound path is released, select the two smaller shapes and use the Pathfinder unite to combine them, then repeat with the two large shapes. Then select both shapes with the smaller shape on top of the larger, and use Pathfinder minus front to create the new inline art. Looks like I've got a bit of an awkward chin situation here. You could manually modify the points, but, you know, the quickest way to rectify this is to undo all the previous actions up until combining the shapes and use the move the shapes further apart. Then I use Pathfinder unite. Pathfinder minus front to create the new line art. I finish off by bringing in the sides of the face using the Free Transform tool. Okay, crisis averted now. So the next part of the process is to mirror the eye and the eyebrow area. Use a selection tool to select the whole eye, and then group it together using control and then g. Mirror in exactly the same way by using object>transform>reflect. Then on the vertical axis, and click on copy. Then move the eye into place. If your eyes aren't level, use the align panel to make sure they're perfectly aligned with one another. With the stock image hidden, I then modify the face shape and placement so the eyes are more central. As part of the model face is hidden I'm doing a little guesswork with where the left side of the face is. As long as you're not wanting to create a carbon copy of the model, you're free to modify her face as you wish. Let's get back to work on those eyes They look fine, right. Well there's one dead giveaway and that's the light reflection on the eye. It needs to be at the same angle and placement on both eyes. Otherwise it's just telling people straight away that you've duplicated the eyes. So I first select and un-group the eyes. With the selection tool, I select one of the eye's light reflections and delete them. I then select the other reflections and duplicate them, and move them across to the other eye. Now the eyes are perfect. I'm not 100% happy with the nose. it feels as if it's turned slightly. So, I'm going to modify those eyes using the direct selection tool. To make sure it's aligned properly on the face, I use the line segment tool to line up the inner eyes to the nostrils. As long as they line up, then I'm doing it right. And that's the end of mirroring and tweaking of the portrait. But is it me, or does she actually look a bit like Angelina Jolie at this stage? Not a bad thing I'm sure. Next time on an Introduction to Vector Line Art, I'm going to show you how to create complex line art hair using a simple art brush. And it's not as scary as it sounds, so don't worry. Thanks for listening.

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