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How to Create a Delicious Jelly Bean Text Effect in Photoshop

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Final product image
What You'll Be Creating

In this tutorial, I will show you how to create a delicious jelly bean text effect in Adobe Photoshop using a simple custom brush, a stroke, and some layer styles. Let's get started!

Tutorial Assets

The following assets were used during the production of this tutorial. If they are not available, you may need to find alternatives.

1. Create the Brush Tip

Step 1

Create a new 500 x 500px document, pick the Ellipse Tool, and create a 175 x 385px ellipse in the center of the document.

Step 2

Pick the Direct Selection Tool, then click-drag to select the two horizontal anchor points of the ellipse.

Step 3

Press the Left Arrow Key a couple of times to move the selected points to the left a little bit.

Step 4

Now select the two vertical points, then go to Edit > Transform Points > Scale, press and hold the Alt key, and drag the right side outwards. The Alt key will drag the left side outwards at the same time. Hit the Enter key when done to accept the changes.

Step 5

After that, use the Direct Selection Tool to select the points you have and move them around, until you get the bean shape you like.

Step 6

Go to Edit > Define Brush Preset and type in a name for the brush tip.

2. Create the Background

Step 1

Create a new 1250 x 1250px document, and set the Resolution value to 200.

Set the Foreground color to #f7f7f7 and the Background color to #cdc9c8. Pick the Gradient Tool, choose the Foreground to Background gradient fill, and click the Radial Gradient icon.

Then, click-drag from the center of the document to one of the corners to create the background gradient, and duplicate the Background layer.

Step 2

Double-Click the copy Background layer to apply a Pattern Overlay effect:

  • Blend Mode: Multiply
  • Opacity: 60%
  • Pattern: Rocky wall

Step 3

This will apply a subtle texture to the background.

3. Create the Text

Step 1

Create the text using the font "Insaniburger". If you're using more than one line of text, create each one in a separate layer.

Step 2

In this tutorial, different font sizes are used as well. The bigger text Size is 150pt, and the smaller text Size is 100pt. The Tracking value is set to 75 to avoid any stroke overlapping.

4. Create the Work Path

Step 1

Right-Click the text layer and choose Create Work Path.

Step 2

Make the bigger text layer invisible by clicking the eye icon next to it, create a new layer on top of the text layer and call it Stroke, then pick the Brush Tool.

5. Stroke the Text With Brush

Step 1

Open the Brush panel (Window > Brush), pick the bean tip you defined, and modify its Settings as shown below:

Brush Tip Shape.

Step 2

Shape Dynamics

Step 3

Set the Foreground color to #000000, then hit the Enter key once to stroke the path with the modified brush.

6. Fix the Overlapping Areas

Step 1

Some areas will have overlapping tips, which need to be fixed.

Step 2

To do so, use the Eraser Tool to erase those areas.

Step 3

Then pick the Brush Tool once again, and start clicking and dragging slightly to fill those empty parts. It is important to follow the original flow (direction) of the area you're filling, because otherwise, the added tips will look out of place.

Step 4

Make sure not to leave any connected or overlapping tips before you move on to the next step.

7. Style the Beans

Step 1

Double click the Stroke layer to apply the following Layer Style:

  • Size: 7
  • Uncheck the Use Global Light box
  • Angle: 117
  • Altitude: 58
  • Check the Anti-aliased box
  • Highlight Mode - Opacity: 65%
  • Shadow Mode:
  • Color: #aeaeae
  • Opacity: 15%
Bevel and Emboss

Step 2

  • Check the Anti-aliased box.
Contour

Step 3

  • Pattern: White sand
  • Depth: 50%
Texture

Step 4

  • Blend Mode: Overlay
  • Opacity: 70%
  • Color: #ffffff
  • Technique: Precise
  • Source: Center
  • Size: 16
Inner Glow

Step 5

  • Color: #75b602

This is where you can choose the color you like for your jelly beans, so play around with the colors and use the ones you like.

Color Overlay

Step 6

  • Opacity: 20%
  • Size: 7
Drop Shadow

Step 7

This will style the stroke. The same Layer Style will be used for the other bean layers as well, but the Color Overlay will be modified to get different colors.

So go ahead and copy the Layer Style by Right-Clicking the Stroke layer, and choosing Copy Layer Style.

8. Fill in the Text

Step 1

Create a new layer below the Stroke layer, and call it Pink 1, or any other color name you'll be using to start filling the text. Naming the layers will make identifying them easier, and adding the numbers will help you figure out the order, since the same color will be used more than once for different layers.

For each layer you'll be creating, you'll need to Right-Click it, and choose Paste Layer Style. You can also copy the Layer Style of a certain color, and paste it when creating a new layer for that same color later on.

Step 2

Double click the Pink 1 layer to change the Color Overlay's Color to #da296c. You can go back and change the color once you see how it looks when you create the beans as well.

Step 3

Using the modified bean brush, start clicking-dragging slightly to scatter some beans inside the text. You'll need to add one bean at a time.

Step 4

Then, continue creating new layers, copying and pasting Layer Styles, changing colors, and layering beans all over the text until you like the result. Below are the layers and the colors used in this tutorial (from top to bottom):

  • Pink 3 - #da296c
  • Green 2 - #75b602
  • Purple 2 - #4f2b3a
  • Yellow 2 - #ddc64b
  • Orange 2 - #ea9400
  • Purple 1 - #4f2b3a
  • Yellow 1 - #ddc64b
  • Pink 2 - #da296c
  • Green 1 - #75b602
  • Orange 1 - #ea9400
  • Pink 1 - #da296c

9. Add More Beans to Letters

Step 1

Select the Stroke Layer, then use the Eraser Tool to delete the bottom of one of the letters you have, preferably the last one. Then, use the Brush Tool to add some beans to the sides of the erased area, making it look like it's been opened.

Step 2

Select 3-4 random bean layers, and add a bean to each one of them, like they are falling from the opened part.

Step 3

Group all the bean layers you have to keep things organized.

10. Create a Work Path for Smaller Text

Step 1

Pick the Pen Tool, choose the Path option in the Options bar, create a new layer on top of the smaller text layer and call it with whatever the smaller text you created is.

Then, start creating a work path in the center of the smaller text. Click once to add anchor points, and click and drag to create curves. Use the text as a reference to add the path. You don’t need to follow it exactly or make it perfect, as we’ll work on that next.

You can create the work paths for all the letters at the same time. To separate them when doing so, press and hold the Control key and click once outside each path when you’re done creating it. You can also press and hold the Shift key to create straight lines.

Step 2

After creating all the work paths, pick the Direct Selection Tool, then start modifying them. You can click and drag an anchor point to move it around, or you can click the Direction Points at the end of the two Direction Handles, then move them around to change the orientation of the curve, or drag them outwards and inwards to make the curve wider or narrower.

Step 3

You don't need to create paths for the very small areas, as you can add those manually.

Step 4

Once you're done creating the paths, make the smaller text layer invisible, pick the Brush Tool, copy a Layer Style with the color you want to stroke the path with, and paste it to the smaller text layer you created.

Then, use the same steps as before to stroke the path and modify it. Don't forget to fill any areas you didn't create a work path for.

Congratulations! You're Done.

In this tutorial, the Ellipse Tool was used to create a simple brush tip in the shape of a bean, with the help of the Direct Selection Tool and the Scale Transform Mode.

Then, some text was created with different font sizes, the brush tip settings were modified, and the bigger text was stroked. The stroke was then modified and any overlapping parts were corrected.

After that, the stroke was styled using a couple of Layer Style Effects, giving a candy-like appearance to the beans. The same Layer Style was then copied and pasted to a number of other layers, and the Color Overlay values were changed for those layers to fill in the text with colorful beans. To add a nice touch, a part of the last letter's stroke was opened, and some beans of different colors were added like they've fallen from that part.

As for the smaller text, a work path was created in its center using the Pen tool, then it was stroked and modified using the same steps as before.

So by using the same brush tip and Layer Style, you can just play around with the colors and with layering the beans, and Voila .. You've got a yummy jelly bean text effect!

Please feel free to leave your comments, suggestions, and outcomes below. Thank you.

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